Rangers History Born on this day in 1875, a man who played for Rangers twice and was part of a unique sporting family

dh1963

Well-Known Member
Jimmy Jackson was born in Cambuslang on September 15th 1875. At just two years old, his father uprooted the family, emigrating to Australia seeking a better lifestyle, first in Townsville in Queensland then settling in Newcastle, New South Wales. As a youngster he showed much promise in both the local Rules Football as well as the football brought across from the land of his birth. A strong left sided player who was sure in the tackle, he became the youngest ever player to represent an Australian football team when he made his debut for Hamilton Athletic in 1889 at the age of 13 years 7 months, and continued to play in their first team until a move to Adamstown Rosebud in 1891.

At 19 years old, he returned to Scotland in 1893, initially playing for a couple of seasons in junior football, most notably for hometown team Cambuslang. Then in the late summer of 1896, Jimmy Jackson signed for Rangers. He was seen as cover for the ever dependable left back Jock Drummond, but made his debut on October 17th 1896 at half back in a hard fought 2-1 home win over Clyde thanks to a double by the legendary Kitey McPherson. It was to be his only appearance in the league for the club, with just 2 starts in the Glasgow League at the end of the season before he was transferred to Newcastle United of the second division in May 1897.

He made his Magpies debut in September of that year against Woolwich Arsenal and immediately became a mainstay of the team. He scored in both the opening rounds of the FA Cup and made 27 league starts as Newcastle finished runners-up, giving them the opportunity for promotion to the top division for the first time via playoffs. After seeing off Stoke City, the final round was a two legged affair against Blackburn Rovers. Jackson was the man who scored the 4th and final Newcastle goal in the home second leg as United won 7-4 on aggregate to clinch promotion.

Newcastle consolidated their top flight status in their debut season, finishing 13th. Jimmy Jackson was almost ever present, missing just 3 games the whole season. Although seemingly now settled in the area, newly married with a first child on the way, the popular Jackson was to make a surprise move in the summer of 1899 when he moved south to join second division Woolwich Arsenal. It became clear shortly afterwards that this was no normal transfer when Jackson opened a Sports Outfitters shop in the shadow of the ground, Arsenal helping him set up the business as part of the deal.

This was a transfer that worked out very well for both sides. From his debut in a home defeat against Leicester on the opening day, Jackson was a cornerstone of the side. The club had never played in the top league, and each season with Jackson at automatic left back that dream got closer. 8th in 1900, 7th in 1901, 4th in 1902, 3rd in 1903, then with Jackson a virtual ever present a 2nd place in season 1903/04 saw promotion finally won. Season 1904/05 not only saw the club finally in Division One, but new captain Jimmy Jackson led out the team in their first fixture, ironically at old club Newcastle. Arsenal ended the season in a respectable 10th place, with Jackson now having made 204 starts for the club. He came closest to international recognition during the season, playing in the March 1905 Home Scots v Anglo Scots trial match. He never was selected for Scotland.

Now almost 30, Jackson left Arsenal to become player manager of Leyton, newly admitted to the Southern League. This proved to be a decision he quickly regretted, and within months he left to join West Ham in the same division. He started in all 24 of their remaining league games before accepting an offer to return home to Scotland in May 1906 and to join a former club, Rangers. And what a start he made to his second Ibrox career.

Rangers were in the semi finals of the season ending Charity Cup. On May 5th, Rangers lined up at Parkhead to play league champions Celtic in the semi final with Jackson brought in at left back. The 10,000 crowd were stunned as goals by Jimmy Spiers and John May had William Wilton's men two up in the first 5 minutes. A breathtaking match played in driving rain ended in a 5-3 Rangers victory. A week later, Jackson won a winners medal, as Queens Park were defeated 3-2 thanks to another two Jimmy Speirs strikes.

Jackson remained at Rangers until 1908. His first full season back at the club saw him play 20 times, with the highlight being a 1-0 defeat of Celtic in the Charity Cup final, retaining the trophy and giving him his second (and last) medal at the club. Season 1907-08 was a disappointing one with Celtic sweeping all before them, including a Glasgow Cup final against Jackson and Rangers that went to 2 replays before they narrowly won. On March 14th 1908, Jimmy Jackson played his 43rd and last game for Rangers in a 2-0 win against Clyde before a transfer to Port Glasgow Athletic.

He played over 50 times for Port Glasgow, but his time there ended in acrimonious circumstances when he refused to play in a Scottish Cup tie in 1910 because he claimed he was owed significant arrears of wages of £21. To compound things, the club fined him £20 and suspended him to the end of the season. The SFA ruled in Jackson’s favour as to wages due up until his refusal to play, but confirmed the club fine. He immediately left, and joined Hamilton Academical for what remained of the season. After 8 Hamilton appearances he joined Morton for one season, before a spell at second division Abercorn then retirement in 1914/15 at almost 40 years old.

On leaving the game, the teetotal and deeply religious Jackson became a blacksmith in Greenock, but his links to football didn't end. His 2 sons also carved out careers in the game. His eldest son, also James, was a fine player, mainly at right back. He enjoyed successful spells with Queens Park, Motherwell and Aberdeen in Scottish football. Incredibly, at Aberdeen he played in a team with 3 other Jacksons - Alex (the great future Wembley Wizard), Walter and Willie. He then moved to the English First Division in 1925, joining Liverpool.

At Liverpool, James junior enjoyed a memorable career. He was a regular there for 8 years, notably taking part in some ferocious battles with the Everton forward Dixie Dean. He also developed a unique love-hate relationship with his own goalkeeper, Northern Irishman Elisha Scott, who was infamous for his regular foul mouthed outbursts on the pitch. The devout Presbyterian Jackson took great offence at this, and their regular fallouts kept the club management busy in keeping the peace. He earned the nickname The Parson for his always polite conversation and determination to uphold sportsmanship, and studied Philosophy and Greek at Cambridge. After more than 200 appearances he gave up the game to be ordained as a Presbyterian Minister, taking up the role at a church in Bournemouth. His funeral in 1977 was attended by representatives from both Liverpool and Everton.

Younger brother Archie was also a professional player, although not as successful as his father or brother. He represented several clubs, including Sunderland, Third Lanark and Tranmere Rovers.

Jimmy Jackson also had a much older brother, Andrew, who was captain of the Cambuslang team who reached the 1888 Scottish Cup final and who won 2 caps for Scotland in wins over Wales in1886 and Ireland in 1888.

He also had a famous sporting nephew. His brother Alexander and his wife had a son in 1909 they also named Archie. The family returned to Australia before The Great War, and the young Archie chose cricket as his preferred sport. A prodigious talent as a batsman, he made his first class debut at 15 and represented New South Wales at 17. Then in 1929, aged just 19, he made his full Test debut for Australia against England and scored 164 runs in his debut innings. He was compared favourably with another incredible young talent of the time, Don Bradman, but he only played 8 test matches before serious ill health destroyed his cricket career. He collapsed on the field in a Sheffield Shield match and was diagnosed with tuberculosis, and died at the tragically young age of 23 in February 1933.

Jimmy Jackson will never make the Rangers hall of fame or be remembered as a great club servant.

Twice a Ranger.
A regular in both Newcastle and Arsenal's first ever promotions.
Arsenal's first ever top division captain.
Returned to Ibrox and beat Celtic in his second debut.
Won 2 Charity Cups.
And part of a unique and tragic sporting family.

Born on this date 146 years ago.
 
Last edited:

vinnie

Well-Known Member
Jimmy Jackson was born in Cambuslang on September 15th 1875. At just two years old, his father uprooted the family, emigrating to Australia seeking a better lifestyle, first in Townsville in Queensland then settling in Newcastle, New South Wales. As a youngster he showed much promise in both the local Rules Football as well as the football brought across from the land of his birth. A strong left sided player who was sure in the tackle, he became the youngest ever player to represent an Australian football team when he made his debut for Hamilton Athletic in 1889 at the age of 13 years 7 months, and continued to play in their first team until a move to Adamstown Rosebud in 1891.

At 19 years old, he returned to Scotland in 1893, initially playing for a couple of seasons in junior football, most notably for hometown team Cambuslang. Then in the late summer of 1896, Jimmy Jackson signed for Rangers. He was seen as cover for the ever dependable left back Jock Drummond, but made his debut on October 17th 1896 at half back in a hard fought 2-1 home win over Clyde thanks to a double by the legendary Kitey McPherson. It was to be his only appearance in the league for the club, with just 2 starts in the Glasgow League at the end of the season before he was transferred to Newcastle United of the second division in May 1897.

He made his Magpies debut in September of that year against Woolwich Arsenal and immediately became a mainstay of the team. He scored in both the opening rounds of the FA Cup and made 27 league starts as Newcastle finished runners-up, giving them the opportunity for promotion to the top division for the first time via playoffs. After seeing off Stoke City, the final round was a two legged affair against Blackburn Rovers. Jackson was the man who scored the 4th and final Newcastle goal in the home second leg as United won 7-4 on aggregate to clinch promotion.

Newcastle consolidated their top flight status in their debut season, finishing 13th. Jimmy Jackson was almost ever present, missing just 3 games the whole season. Although seemingly now settled in the area, newly married with a first child on the way, the popular Jackson was to make a surprise move in the summer of 1899 when he moved south to join second division Woolwich Arsenal. It became clear shortly afterwards that this was no normal transfer when Jackson opened a Sports Outfitters shop in the shadow of the ground, Arsenal helping him set up the business as part of the deal.

This was a transfer that worked out very well for both sides. From his debut in a home defeat against Leicester on the opening day, Jackson was a cornerstone of the side. The club had never played in the top league, and each season with Jackson at automatic left back that dream got closer. 8th in 1900, 7th in 1901, 4th in 1902, 3rd in 1903, then with Jackson a virtual ever present a 2nd place in season 1903/04 saw promotion finally won. Season 1904/05 not only saw the club finally in Division One, but new captain Jimmy Jackson led out the team in their first fixture, ironically at old club Newcastle. Arsenal ended the season in a respectable 10th place, with Jackson now having made 204 starts for the club. He came closest to international recognition during the season, playing in the March 1905 Home Scots v Anglo Scots trial match. He never was selected for Scotland.

Now almost 30, Jackson left Arsenal to become player manager of Leyton, newly admitted to the Southern League. This proved to be a decision he quickly regretted, and within months he left to join West Ham in the same division. He started in all 24 of their remaining league games before accepting an offer to return home to Scotland in May 1906 and to join a former club, Rangers. And what a start he made to his second Ibrox career.

Rangers were in the semi finals of the season ending Charity Cup. On May 5th, Rangers lined up at Parkhead to play league champions Celtic in the semi final with Jackson brought in at left back. The 10,000 crowd were stunned as goals by Jimmy Spiers and John May had William Wilton's men two up in the first 5 minutes. A breathtaking match played in driving rain ended in a 5-3 Rangers victory. A week later, Jackson won a winners medal, as Queens Park were defeated 3-2 thanks to another two Jimmy Speirs strikes.

Jackson remained at Rangers until 1908. His first full season back at the club saw him play 20 times, with the highlight being a 1-0 defeat of Celtic in the Charity Cup final, retaining the trophy and giving him his second (and last) medal at the club. Season 1907-08 was a disappointing one with Celtic sweeping all before them, including a Glasgow Cup final against Jackson and Rangers that went to 2 replays before they narrowly won. On March 14th 1908, Jimmy Jackson played his 43rd and last game for Rangers in a 2-0 win against Clyde before a transfer to Port Glasgow Athletic.

He played over 50 times for Port Glasgow, but his time there ended in acrimonious circumstances when he refused to play in a Scottish Cup tie in 1910 because he claimed he was owed significant arrears of wages of £21. To compound things, the club fined him £20 and suspended him to the end of the season. The SFA ruled in Jackson’s favour as to wages due up until his refusal to play, but confirmed the club fine. He immediately left, and joined Hamilton Academical for what remained of the season. After 8 Hamilton appearances he joined Morton for one season, before a spell at second division Abercorn then retirement in 1914/15 at almost 40 years old.

On leaving the game, the teetotal and deeply religious Jackson became a blacksmith in Greenock, but his links to football didn't end. His 2 sons also carved out careers in the game. His eldest son, also James, was a fine player, mainly at right back. He enjoyed successful spells with Queens Park, Motherwell and Aberdeen in Scottish football. Incredibly, at Aberdeen he played in a team with 3 other Jacksons - Alex (the great future Wembley Wizard), Walter and Willie. He then moved to the English First Division in 1925, joining Liverpool.

At Liverpool, James junior enjoyed a memorable career. He was a regular there for 8 years, notably taking part in some ferocious battles with the Everton forward Dixie Dean. He also developed a unique love-hate relationship with his own goalkeeper, Northern Irishman Elisha Scott, who was infamous for his regular foul mouthed outbursts on the pitch. The devout Presbyterian Jackson took great offence at this, and their regular fallouts kept the club management busy in keeping the peace. He earned the nickname The Parson for his always polite conversation and determination to uphold sportsmanship, and studied Philosophy and Greek at Cambridge. After more than 200 appearances he gave up the game to be ordained as a Presbyterian Minister, taking up the role at a church in Bournemouth. His funeral in 1977 was attended by representatives from both Liverpool and Everton.

Younger brother Archie was also a professional player, although not as successful as his father or brother. He represented several clubs, including Sunderland, Third Lanark and Tranmere Rovers.

Jimmy Jackson also had a famous sporting nephew. His brother Alexander and his wife had a son in 1909 they also named Archie. The family returned to Australia before The Great War, and the young Archie chose cricket as his preferred sport. A prodigious talent as a batsman, he made his first class debut at 15 and represented New South Wales at 17. Then in 1929, aged just 19, he made his full Test debut for Australia against England and scored 164 runs in his debut innings. He was compared favourably with another incredible young talent of the time, Don Bradman, but he only played 8 test matches before serious ill health destroyed his cricket career. He collapsed on the field in a Sheffield Shield match and was diagnosed with tuberculosis, and died at the tragically young age of 23 in February 1933.

Jimmy Jackson will never make the Rangers hall of fame or be remembered as a great club servant.

Twice a Ranger.
A regular in both Newcastle and Arsenal's first ever promotions.
Arsenal's first ever top division captain.
Returned to Ibrox and beat Celtic in his second debut.
Won 2 Charity Cups.
And part of a unique and tragic sporting family.

Born on this date 146 years ago.
Great read, found this too about James Jackson jnr.
 

vinnie

Well-Known Member
He sounds like a man worthy of a thread of his own.
Only the son of a Ranger though. Thought I’d look him up because I used to live in Bournemouth and attended church back then. Wondered if he was linked to anywhere I’d been. But he isn’t.

Would have been a worthy Ranger.
 

dh1963

Well-Known Member
A last wee bump for a history thread for the evening shift, before it becomes history itself.
 

bluebeak

Well-Known Member
Jimmy Jackson was born in Cambuslang on September 15th 1875. At just two years old, his father uprooted the family, emigrating to Australia seeking a better lifestyle, first in Townsville in Queensland then settling in Newcastle, New South Wales. As a youngster he showed much promise in both the local Rules Football as well as the football brought across from the land of his birth. A strong left sided player who was sure in the tackle, he became the youngest ever player to represent an Australian football team when he made his debut for Hamilton Athletic in 1889 at the age of 13 years 7 months, and continued to play in their first team until a move to Adamstown Rosebud in 1891.

At 19 years old, he returned to Scotland in 1893, initially playing for a couple of seasons in junior football, most notably for hometown team Cambuslang. Then in the late summer of 1896, Jimmy Jackson signed for Rangers. He was seen as cover for the ever dependable left back Jock Drummond, but made his debut on October 17th 1896 at half back in a hard fought 2-1 home win over Clyde thanks to a double by the legendary Kitey McPherson. It was to be his only appearance in the league for the club, with just 2 starts in the Glasgow League at the end of the season before he was transferred to Newcastle United of the second division in May 1897.

He made his Magpies debut in September of that year against Woolwich Arsenal and immediately became a mainstay of the team. He scored in both the opening rounds of the FA Cup and made 27 league starts as Newcastle finished runners-up, giving them the opportunity for promotion to the top division for the first time via playoffs. After seeing off Stoke City, the final round was a two legged affair against Blackburn Rovers. Jackson was the man who scored the 4th and final Newcastle goal in the home second leg as United won 7-4 on aggregate to clinch promotion.

Newcastle consolidated their top flight status in their debut season, finishing 13th. Jimmy Jackson was almost ever present, missing just 3 games the whole season. Although seemingly now settled in the area, newly married with a first child on the way, the popular Jackson was to make a surprise move in the summer of 1899 when he moved south to join second division Woolwich Arsenal. It became clear shortly afterwards that this was no normal transfer when Jackson opened a Sports Outfitters shop in the shadow of the ground, Arsenal helping him set up the business as part of the deal.

This was a transfer that worked out very well for both sides. From his debut in a home defeat against Leicester on the opening day, Jackson was a cornerstone of the side. The club had never played in the top league, and each season with Jackson at automatic left back that dream got closer. 8th in 1900, 7th in 1901, 4th in 1902, 3rd in 1903, then with Jackson a virtual ever present a 2nd place in season 1903/04 saw promotion finally won. Season 1904/05 not only saw the club finally in Division One, but new captain Jimmy Jackson led out the team in their first fixture, ironically at old club Newcastle. Arsenal ended the season in a respectable 10th place, with Jackson now having made 204 starts for the club. He came closest to international recognition during the season, playing in the March 1905 Home Scots v Anglo Scots trial match. He never was selected for Scotland.

Now almost 30, Jackson left Arsenal to become player manager of Leyton, newly admitted to the Southern League. This proved to be a decision he quickly regretted, and within months he left to join West Ham in the same division. He started in all 24 of their remaining league games before accepting an offer to return home to Scotland in May 1906 and to join a former club, Rangers. And what a start he made to his second Ibrox career.

Rangers were in the semi finals of the season ending Charity Cup. On May 5th, Rangers lined up at Parkhead to play league champions Celtic in the semi final with Jackson brought in at left back. The 10,000 crowd were stunned as goals by Jimmy Spiers and John May had William Wilton's men two up in the first 5 minutes. A breathtaking match played in driving rain ended in a 5-3 Rangers victory. A week later, Jackson won a winners medal, as Queens Park were defeated 3-2 thanks to another two Jimmy Speirs strikes.

Jackson remained at Rangers until 1908. His first full season back at the club saw him play 20 times, with the highlight being a 1-0 defeat of Celtic in the Charity Cup final, retaining the trophy and giving him his second (and last) medal at the club. Season 1907-08 was a disappointing one with Celtic sweeping all before them, including a Glasgow Cup final against Jackson and Rangers that went to 2 replays before they narrowly won. On March 14th 1908, Jimmy Jackson played his 43rd and last game for Rangers in a 2-0 win against Clyde before a transfer to Port Glasgow Athletic.

He played over 50 times for Port Glasgow, but his time there ended in acrimonious circumstances when he refused to play in a Scottish Cup tie in 1910 because he claimed he was owed significant arrears of wages of £21. To compound things, the club fined him £20 and suspended him to the end of the season. The SFA ruled in Jackson’s favour as to wages due up until his refusal to play, but confirmed the club fine. He immediately left, and joined Hamilton Academical for what remained of the season. After 8 Hamilton appearances he joined Morton for one season, before a spell at second division Abercorn then retirement in 1914/15 at almost 40 years old.

On leaving the game, the teetotal and deeply religious Jackson became a blacksmith in Greenock, but his links to football didn't end. His 2 sons also carved out careers in the game. His eldest son, also James, was a fine player, mainly at right back. He enjoyed successful spells with Queens Park, Motherwell and Aberdeen in Scottish football. Incredibly, at Aberdeen he played in a team with 3 other Jacksons - Alex (the great future Wembley Wizard), Walter and Willie. He then moved to the English First Division in 1925, joining Liverpool.

At Liverpool, James junior enjoyed a memorable career. He was a regular there for 8 years, notably taking part in some ferocious battles with the Everton forward Dixie Dean. He also developed a unique love-hate relationship with his own goalkeeper, Northern Irishman Elisha Scott, who was infamous for his regular foul mouthed outbursts on the pitch. The devout Presbyterian Jackson took great offence at this, and their regular fallouts kept the club management busy in keeping the peace. He earned the nickname The Parson for his always polite conversation and determination to uphold sportsmanship, and studied Philosophy and Greek at Cambridge. After more than 200 appearances he gave up the game to be ordained as a Presbyterian Minister, taking up the role at a church in Bournemouth. His funeral in 1977 was attended by representatives from both Liverpool and Everton.

Younger brother Archie was also a professional player, although not as successful as his father or brother. He represented several clubs, including Sunderland, Third Lanark and Tranmere Rovers.

Jimmy Jackson also had a much older brother, Andrew, who was captain of the Cambuslang team who reached the 1888 Scottish Cup final and who won 2 caps for Scotland in wins over Wales in1886 and Ireland in 1888.

He also had a famous sporting nephew. His brother Alexander and his wife had a son in 1909 they also named Archie. The family returned to Australia before The Great War, and the young Archie chose cricket as his preferred sport. A prodigious talent as a batsman, he made his first class debut at 15 and represented New South Wales at 17. Then in 1929, aged just 19, he made his full Test debut for Australia against England and scored 164 runs in his debut innings. He was compared favourably with another incredible young talent of the time, Don Bradman, but he only played 8 test matches before serious ill health destroyed his cricket career. He collapsed on the field in a Sheffield Shield match and was diagnosed with tuberculosis, and died at the tragically young age of 23 in February 1933.

Jimmy Jackson will never make the Rangers hall of fame or be remembered as a great club servant.

Twice a Ranger.
A regular in both Newcastle and Arsenal's first ever promotions.
Arsenal's first ever top division captain.
Returned to Ibrox and beat Celtic in his second debut.
Won 2 Charity Cups.
And part of a unique and tragic sporting family.

Born on this date 146 years ago.
Lived the dream.
 

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