Brian Clough after Forest’s relegation.

Bristol_bnose3

Well-Known Member
Apropos of nothing, but I came across this on YouTube and thought it was worth sharing on here as a bit of a footballing curiosity.
Interview with Clough after Forest were relegated. You forget what a character Clough was - it’s almost like an actor playing a part. Hard to imagine how he’d fare in today’s media savvy world but I just think this is great whilst also very sad, given the benefit of hindsight.

And just to add, he was only 58 here!!!

 

Bristol_bnose3

Well-Known Member
Think he physically grabbed a supporter that got on the field one year.

nowadays he would probably be arrested.
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Bear all

Well-Known Member
Apropos of nothing, but I came across this on YouTube and thought it was worth sharing on here as a bit of a footballing curiosity.
Interview with Clough after Forest were relegated. You forget what a character Clough was - it’s almost like an actor playing a part. Hard to imagine how he’d fare in today’s media savvy world but I just think this is great whilst also very sad, given the benefit of hindsight.

And just to add, he was only 58 here!!!

I remember that interview at the time can’t watch it, would rather remember Brian Clough as the football genius he was he was just an empty shell there such a shame .
 

Bear all

Well-Known Member
Helluva shame to see the end.

Hardly a surprise for the players to give up the ghost a bit and end up relegated.

For me, the greatest manager of all time.
Could have took the England much further if they had given him the reins but that was never going to happen.
 

Thommo2006

Well-Known Member
Some of the stories about him are belters.

Mark crossley on the under the cosh podcast has a few good ones. Best one is the day after he made his made pro debut clough called him to his house long story short he makes him play for a pals Sunday league team, the team get fined 50 quid for playing a ringer and clough makes crossley pay it haha
 

SirWalterSmith

Well-Known Member
Apropos of nothing, but I came across this on YouTube and thought it was worth sharing on here as a bit of a footballing curiosity.
Interview with Clough after Forest were relegated. You forget what a character Clough was - it’s almost like an actor playing a part. Hard to imagine how he’d fare in today’s media savvy world but I just think this is great whilst also very sad, given the benefit of hindsight.

And just to add, he was only 58 here!!!

Grim watch , never seen it. Sad to think hes only 58, he looks far gone in that interview.

Uncomfortable watching it, thanks for posting it though mate, a stark reminder to us all of the dangers of drink
 

SirWalterSmith

Well-Known Member
A genius complete with the flaws that goes with it.........
Walter Smith says in the Gascoigne video, "you dont live with the genius the genius lives with you, meaning you just have to take them and their flaws, if you suppress the flaws do you get the genius? Or is it just a case of the two go hand in hand?
 

Brian Laudrup

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Im old enough to remember the two European Cup wins and always had a soft spot for Notts Forest after that.Clough was obviously a great manager but his assistant Peter Taylor must be given great credit too.

Any stories you here about him are hilarious and Mark Crossleys’s podcast about him is just unbelievable because of the things he said
 

ChrisWoods

Well-Known Member
I've watched as many Clough documentaries as I can find on youtube, all very entertaining, I think immortal7 may be right I think he knocked the drinking on the head after retirement.

The Damned United movie was a much softer portrayal of him than the book, it was the book his family objected to.
 

walt mcmurty

Well-Known Member
Younger people think the impossible happened when Leicester won the league.
But it’s no way near what Clough achieved with Forrest.

To win the league they had to beat arguably the best team on the planet at the time and reigning European champions.
Then they had to beat them again, now as 2 in a row champions of Europe, over 2 legs in their very first European Cup ties.

All this is achieved with a squad of about 16 players. If injuries or suspensions take over then he just called up the reserves.
Sad to see what alcohol had done to the man, but I will always remember him by the miracles he achieved in the late 70’s.
 

MaryleboneBluenose

Well-Known Member
A hard watch. Amazing what he achieved with both Derby and Forest.

He didn’t like us, did he? Is there not some footage of him describing us as “villains”? Might have been some of the play acting he was fond of right enough.
 

ScouseHairline

Well-Known Member
A hard watch. Amazing what he achieved with both Derby and Forest.

He didn’t like us, did he? Is there not some footage of him describing us as “villains”? Might have been some of the play acting he was fond of right enough.

Not sure on that story, but remember seeing footage of him being on a football program (no idea, very old) and a Rangers fan in the crowd gets to ask him a question I think, and when Clough asks who he supports he wasn't complimentary at all, along the lines of "Rangers? That's not football," something like that. The Rangers fan says with an aye but "champions." It may well be the same story and I've misremembered it.
 

Oleg_McNoleg

Well-Known Member
I was at university in Nottingham around then and went to see Forest a few times. Was a real shame as they only needed a couple of players—striker and a centre back mainly—to have been a decent side. But Clough freely admitted he couldn’t pick strikers. Strange as he’d been a very good one. But you can’t replace Teddy Sheringham with Robert Rosario and expect to succeed.
But, as noted, Clough was not in good shape by then. There were some grim tabloid pics of him face down in a ditch soon after.
 

Grant K

Well-Known Member
Clough was a genius but Sir Alex has no equal, he is arguably the greatest manager of all time and is by the length of Paisley Road West, the finest manager these shores have produced.

I can’t say one was better than the other because there is no base point to start a judgement.
I have to admit to having a soft spot for Forest having seen then many times since the early ‘70s. What is often forgotten is that Forest were a mid table 2nd division side when Clough took over. He got them promoted and won the First Division first time of asking and then two European Cup wins along with League Cup victories.

As well as playing good football he had an ability to take average players and make them great team players. His captain at Forest was John McGovern, Larry Lloyd at centre half, John O’Hare and Ian Bowyer were bang average players that he manage to get tunes from while getting the best from talents like Robertson and O’Neil.
 

Johnny Yen

Well-Known Member
I can’t say one was better than the other because there is no base point to start a judgement.
I have to admit to having a soft spot for Forest having seen then many times since the early ‘70s. What is often forgotten is that Forest were a mid table 2nd division side when Clough took over. He got them promoted and won the First Division first time of asking and then two European Cup wins along with League Cup victories.

As well as playing good football he had an ability to take average players and make them great team players. His captain at Forest was John McGovern, Larry Lloyd at centre half, John O’Hare and Ian Bowyer were bang average players that he manage to get tunes from while getting the best from talents like Robertson and O’Neil.
I’ve no doubts whatsoever that Clough was a genius, his record and achievements were unbelievable, I still maintain SAF is by far the greatest though.
 

Grant K

Well-Known Member
I was at university in Nottingham around then and went to see Forest a few times. Was a real shame as they only needed a couple of players—striker and a centre back mainly—to have been a decent side. But Clough freely admitted he couldn’t pick strikers. Strange as he’d been a very good one. But you can’t replace Teddy Sheringham with Robert Rosario and expect to succeed.
But, as noted, Clough was not in good shape by then. There were some grim tabloid pics of him face down in a ditch soon after.

His inability to pick a striker was undoubtedly his Achilles heel. He had some success in bringing young strikers through, Peter Withe, Gary Birtles and probably the best of the bunch Tony Woodcock. However his dealings in the transfer market was characterised by overpaying for young and ultimately unsuccessful strikers Wallace, Justin Fashanu are two that come to mind.
 

Corkinator

Well-Known Member
As a Rangers fan who lives in Nottingham and frequently vists the city ground on many occasion, even in division 2, every season. I’ve had friends who played for Nottingham forest and want the best for the club, revered brian clough and enjoyed his football experience. The fact he says “he’s a good socialist” disgusts me as I don’t believe there is such a thing.
 

Jonathan E

Well-Known Member
They were upset with the novel as it was complete fiction masquerading as fact.
It's an excellent book but it doesn't claim to be factual.

The subtitle is 'An English Fairy Story' and the author David Peace acknowledged in the book, 'This novel is another fiction, based on another fact.' (His previous novel, GB84, was a fiction based on some facts of the Miner's Strike.)
 
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scottwoodburn

Well-Known Member
Can’t help but get emotional at that. Clough was one of those figures from my childhood that was always there. When he left Forest it was truly the end of an era, not just for Clough but that generation altogether. A true legend of the sport and we can only imagine what he would have managed with England in his prime. He was a great player too before injury.
 
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