Funeral of a hero

pelem

Well-Known Member
God Bless You Mr William Dunsmore.


Can anyone in attendance give an update from todays service. Thank You.
 

Purplestar

Well-Known Member
I went to this today and was very heartened when driving towards the cemetery to see so many cars heading in.

Piper and two standards ahead of the hearse and many of the Armed forces past and present in attendance as well as many from the general public.

Fantastic gesture.

Rest In Peace Willie.
 

MrSteve83

Well-Known Member
Apologies gentlemen, I missed the funeral this morning-i didn’t expect how my day wasn’t going to pan out...delighted to hear of the turn out and well done to those present. RIP
 

Garrioch Bear

Well-Known Member
I entered the cemetery with his carer Francis ( not knowing at the time who she was ) she couldn’t contain her joy at seeing the piper, 2 standard bearers
plus all the various ranks from the military ex and current and of course the Rangers family. The celebrant admitted on a couple of occasions to being speechless at the turnout. She gave a lovely service including 2 very
touching and impressive poems, The Dash and A Soldier. A truly proud and
memorable send off to Mr. Dunsmore.
 

Zander73

Well-Known Member
Fantastic effort any and all who turned up.

As an asides, I wish the country would do more for lonely older people, especially those who have served. It's a shame that it takes death to bring people together.
I agree with you mate. As an ex soldier and living down south now I’ve been involved a few times in getting old regiment members together to turn up at old soldiers funerals especially when they have no family.
When I seen this thread it really touched me and brought back memories. Like I said earlier it means a lot to people when they see all these ex serving members turn up.
Obviously living down here I couldn’t make it today but hearing how many turned up brought a lump to my throat.
Again well done to you all. Outstanding effort.
 

Jan Wyck

Well-Known Member
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
 

The Hiram Key

Active Member
A fantastic and deserved turnout. The amount of military members past and present was an absolute joy to see. There was young soldier there resplendent in full uniform who looked about 17 years old and there were elderly gentlemen in the final flush of life and all were a credit to the armed Forces.
The lady conducting the service was truly amazed by the turnout and delivered a cracking service.

A fitting last tune by Frank Sinatra sent a soldier to his final posting... Stand down sir
 

Zander73

Well-Known Member
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
Well done mate. Excellent post ;)
 

Papasmurf

Scum Evictor
Official Ticketer
A fantastic and deserved turnout. The amount of military members past and present was an absolute joy to see. There was young soldier there resplendent in full uniform who looked about 17 years old and there were elderly gentlemen in the final flush of life and all were a credit to the armed Forces.
The lady conducting the service was truly amazed by the turnout and delivered a cracking service.

A fitting last tune by Frank Sinatra sent a soldier to his final posting... Stand down sir
You are right. It was a cracking service. She should be very proud of herself.
 

Papasmurf

Scum Evictor
Official Ticketer
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
You captured it very well.

Made me realise there is a lot of good still floating about this world
 

The Hiram Key

Active Member
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
This sums it up more eloquently than I did or could.

I was one of the hour off work folk and I would normally never attend a funeral dressed like a tramp in cargo pants and a hoodie but there were no “looks” from anyone just knowing glances and silent acknowledgement that we were all there to say thank you and goodbye to someone we all knew but had never heard of until a few days ago.
 
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Zander73

Well-Known Member
Amazing to see all your comments. And I’m guessing this won’t be the last time you will all attend something like this.
It really does put life into perspective when you’ve experienced something like this also. The old boy will be looking down now with a tear in his eye.
I’ve being showing some of my ex regiment members down south this thread since it started. To say they are amazed would be an understatement.
 

ibroxroar67

Active Member

Family bam

Well-Known Member
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
What a fantastic post.

Cap well and truly doffed.
 

BlueBlooded

Active Member
Was a send off befitting a hero.

As folk more skilled at describing things have already shared
details of the day, I would like to opt to just add a few lines
of a personal nature.

My late mother spent some time in Darnley Court and I have no words that can fully express how wonderful the staff were.

Playing "My Way" had a oddly uplifting effect on me, as it was played at the close of each session of the Whisky Festivals that I helped out at during my time working in the Netherlands.

As a result, I hear Francis Albert's dulcet tones and immediately envisage scores of well-oiled Dutchmen descending upon us, looking for one more dram before the song ends and we are obliged to stop serving them.

Equally the end of the song marked the point at which we could pour ourselves a dram or three :))

Tonight I'll play the song, then have a wee single malt and drink a toast to William.
 

TN8

Well-Known Member
First I've seen this thread and I'm actually having a wee bit of a greet reading it, not ashamed to say it.

Well done to the OP and everyone who attended. Fantastic stuff.
 

Ronnietheranger

Well-Known Member
I also had the privilege today to attend the service for Mr Dunsmore.

As stated above the attendance was well into three figures. Among the throng gathering there were Glengarry's and military caps and berets of many hues. I was among the traditionally suited and booted, but many were just good folk who had taken an hour or so off work or their daily routine to pay their respects. Also the Bikers who arrived in their own "colours" deserve a mention in despatches.
Mr Dunsmore was led to the entrance of the Crematorium by a young piper called Alan who we were informed had kindly offered his services. This civilian salutes you young man.
Flanked by bearers with Union Flag and Military Colours, coffin draped in the flag of his regiment, it was a truly strange but poignant and humbling experience to stand among strangers to watch and pay tribute to a man almost none of us had met.
There was press and photographers in attendance to witness Mr Dunsmore on his last journey so you may get something in some newspapers.
The Celebrant managed to give us a background to the life of William Dunsmore. Born in 1939 at the outbreak of war, William was an only child. He served in the Military from 1956 till 1960 and that is where he gained his love of Cyprus. He married Jessie, the love of his life, but they were never gifted with the blessing of children. Sadly she passed at the cruelly young age of 59 and his life was never the same. Mr Dunsmore unfortunately had a fall just over a year ago and was in the care of the Local Authority in between spells in hospital. None of the above stopped him enjoying his can of Tennents or flirting with his home helps and carers who sat at the front where family would usually take their place.
We only have to turn the pages of a newspaper, switch on our TV's, or observe the behaviour of some politicians, to despair at the what has become of common decent humanity in this day and age. Today at Craigton Crematorium, among strangers, it made me feel good to be part of the human race.

Thank you William Dunsmore for your service.
A superb post, I had a tear in my eye reading this and reading through this thread. Well done sir & all those who made Mr. Dunsmore's farewell a fitting one.
 

senefelder

Well-Known Member
To add further to my earlier point regarding our military sticking together, there was a young English woman there on crutches who we were next to in the Crematorium. Clearly she was on sick leave from whatever regiment she's in. Well done young lady you're a credit to yourself, family and regiment.
 
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