Hibs ending all Match Programmes (including digital)

Ferrybear73

Well-Known Member
Are programmes a British thing?

I’ve been to games in Europe, Spain and Italy mainly, and it isn’t a thing. I can remember heading to the Stadio Olimpico in Rome for Lazio v Juve and asking my mate Pino where I could get a programme and he looked at me as if ‘what do you mean?’

Souvenirs for big games, cup finals and tournaments I kinda get, but in reality you are just making a donation to the club in essence aren’t you?
I know in Spain some teams used to give away free programmes in the stadiums. It's certainly not as big culturally on the continent as it is in the UK.
 

Ferrybear73

Well-Known Member
He is not bitter and always saying good thing s about rangers
have bought many programmes off him
He is a sound bloke who is good to chat too about football, is very knowledgeable about programmes and has helped me obtain some harder to get Rangers ones.
 

TCWNS1872

Well-Known Member
I know in Spain some teams used to give away free programmes in the stadiums. It's certainly not as big culturally on the continent as it is in the UK.
In Spain, in my experience, the free programme is like an advertiser newspaper and not really a programme in the British sense. My experience might be well out of date though.

What about Holland and Germany?
 

superallythe2nd

Well-Known Member
Used to always get a programme and keep my ticket stubs when I went to games when I was younger. I didn't get to many, so when I did I made sure to keep the memories of the day.

Having grown-up (chronologically) and got a ST, I very rarely get a programme these days and if I do, it's usually for a significant game (the last one I bought was for title day against the Sheep in May just past) Even at that, it'll get a wee quick read through before it's chucked into a box with the rest but if I ever have the inkling to go read it again (properly) then it's there.

That said, it's quite sad to see that Hibs will be doing away with them completely (thought they may have retained a digital version at least) but unfortunately it's the way of the world now.
 

sw26

Well-Known Member
Whats the point of them, other than for collectors?

Presumably it still makes the club a small profit, otherwise we would be doing similarly to Hibs I imagine.

I still buy one every home game, rarely read it but just a habit I had since I was a kid and I’ve got quite a collection now. I think of it as essentially a donation to the club at this point to be honest.
 

Ferrybear73

Well-Known Member
Used to always get a programme and keep my ticket stubs when I went to games when I was younger. I didn't get to many, so when I did I made sure to keep the memories of the day.

Having grown-up (chronologically) and got a ST, I very rarely get a programme these days and if I do, it's usually for a significant game (the last one I bought was for title day against the Sheep in May just past) Even at that, it'll get a wee quick read through before it's chucked into a box with the rest but if I ever have the inkling to go read it again (properly) then it's there.

That said, it's quite sad to see that Hibs will be doing away with them completely (thought they may have retained a digital version at least) but unfortunately it's the way of the world now.
Sadly m8, you are right. Programmes may well be a thing of the past in a few years to come.
 

Written Publications

That starts with our matchday programme. We used the international break to analyse the readership, downloads, and purchases of each edition and have made a decision to no longer continue with these in their current format.

We do, however, understand that there is a section of our supporters, currently and historically, that like to purchase written publications from us. With this in mind, we’ve come up with an alternative and will produce a 100-page quarterly magazine.

The magazine will attempt to bring you closer to the club, our players, our staff, and aim to give you a great insight into Hibernian FC.

We aspire to print the first edition in January 2022 and we will provide all supporters who have purchased the printed programmes so far this season, from Curtis Sport, the first one free of charge.

More details on the quarterly magazine will be released in due course.

Equally, we will produce a number of new features on hibernianfc.co.uk, so make sure you check that out! We’re hoping that it’ll provide you with all your content needs ahead of a matchday.

How can a quarterly magazine get you closer to the club! Ridiculous marketing guff. This is a cost-cutting exercise, sad days but the world moved on many years ago. Hope Rangers still print programmes for at least another decade or so.
 

scottwoodburn

Well-Known Member
Yeh I’m 42, and in my early years of attending matches loved getting a programme. I was a football geek though and loved reading the Rothmans Football Yearbook as well. As others have said, kids these days can get their football fix from the internet, FIFA ultimate team etc.
The relentless March of ‘progress’ makes it inevitable they’ll disappear at some point, same as the Rangers News and those Saturday teatime football papers!
Aye, Ireland’s Saturday Night was my old favourite. All the days footy results including scores from the BB leagues and a ranty letters page. Used to hit the newsagents at about 6pm Saturday night. Good memories.
 

Loyal72

Well-Known Member
Other than for the collectors, they are essentially defunct.

Back in the day, all the stuff that we can find online for free now, would be rammed into these programmes, and it was the only way to really get a look into players lives at the club etc, outside of the mainstream snippets.

We're deeper in their personal lives than ever thanks to social media, and the clubs put everything into social and digital marketing these days.

They'll all go eventually.
 

HereLiesDavidStHubbins

Well-Known Member
From a nostalgia point of view it's a bit of a shame but they don't really offer much these days, at least not at our level (would still buy one at the juniors though).

Match day squads, adverts and some bland words from the manager and captain. The only time I'd buy one at Ibrox would be if my boy was with me to add to the experience.
 

The Great Waldo

Well-Known Member
There is still quite a few Bears who collect programmes (me included) & some are going for ridiculous prices just now on ebay.

For example the other day there, a B team programme, this season v Edinburgh University, went for about £48 .

Other Rangers ones, mainly pre 60s, are going for hundreds of pounds.

I would be gutted if other clubs followed Ross Co. & Hibs and stopped producing them.
 

TheDerryend

Well-Known Member
There is still quite a few Bears who collect programmes (me included) & some are going for ridiculous prices just now on ebay.

For example the other day there, a B team programme, this season v Edinburgh University, went for about £48 .

Other Rangers ones, mainly pre 60s, are going for hundreds of pounds.

I would be gutted if other clubs followed Ross Co. & Hibs and stopped producing them.
I've got a good few from the 70's, how much are they pulling in mate?
 

bilkobear

Well-Known Member
Being an avid collector over the years and latterly like everyone else, a user of digital media, I have mixed feelings about this.
I can understand that you can gain all the information you require on your computer, your laptop and of course when at the football itself, from the telephone in your pocket.

Initially, programmes were an aid to the customer at an event.
Providing useful information in regard to the who, what, where and when and were usually provided by a local printer in tandem with the requirements of the event organiser.

In time, they provided a secondary function as a souvenir of the event itself.
In this, they acquired the status of collectability.
Indeed they initially evoked all the elements of the event, including authentic cultural representation through the local printer utilised, even down to the typeset and paper quality.
All of this was visually evident, and every particular unique characteristic of the host could be recognised and reflected in the publication to be fondly recalled in a future moment.

In regard to football, it was actually an interesting milestoning of the timelines and background being recorded for those making the journey, be it through the domestic leagues or for the more exotic occasions beyond the ordinary such as friendlies and games abroad.
Crucially, back in the day, these publications were small, neat and easy to store.

Then it all changed.
Big magazine productions began to replace the earlier primitive local efforts.
No different to a cold war arms race, clubs began to print bigger to outdo the competition, slowly the local printer wasn't up to the task and the big printing houses moved in.
Eventually, the heavy overstated glossy magazines that looked little different to one another no longer being representations of any club individuality or locality, became so huge and heavy, that they were no longer capable of being stored in the average three-bedroomed house.

The days of the programme collection for a married man anyway, were certainly numbered.

Paper seems overall to have lost its attraction for today's youth.
They care not much for actual books and of course, why should they?
Almost everything that could be put onto a piece of flattened wood pulp can easily be evoked at the touch of a few buttons and displayed in lustrous colour on a screen.
Indeed if need be, it can also be printed bespoke fashion fairly inexpensively.

So this is where we are today.
Personally, I feel a loss.
I feel a loss for the paper match ticket another casualty of the digital revolution, that when produced creatively is a fantastic memoir of a football match.
I feel a loss at the old style football programme that was often quite rudimentary but sometimes on occasion extremely poignant and even surprisingly eye-catching and artistically produced.
Certainly, it was nearly always satisfying in doing its basic function for a football supporter to serve as a landmark for the occasion.

However, I don't feel a loss for the modern matchday magazine.
It had lost its ability to evoke singularity.
It no longer anchored itself in a cultural setting.
It was indeed going to its own grave ironically the size of a fckng gravestone.
Further, it had become outrageously expensive for an item that you simply couldn't afford to even keep without a bluddy divorce!
 
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ML9

Well-Known Member
As a traditionalist, it’s a real shame. I’d be interested in the age demographic of those buying programmes. I wouldn’t imagine too many youngsters pester their parents for one so they’ll undoubtedly be on the decline. I rarely buy one now, I bought every one for our home games in the 3rd division as a kind of ‘this could be a good memory one day’ type thing.
Completely get your point, but everything has a "Retro" value. digital collections are fine and well, but you can't literaly eyeball digital content you want to view because it's not in your physical line of sight the way print is.
You have to search for it. That for me can be a pain and boring - I could source in a print library generally quicker and certainly more pleasurable.

In my experience the age demographic is irrelevant as long as the content is free/cheap - I'm available for consultation @Greg Marshall #marketing B-)
 

Govan_Guy

Well-Known Member
The relentless March of ‘progress’ makes it inevitable they’ll disappear at some point, same as the Rangers News and those Saturday teatime football papers!
Loved those papers, would be in the shop by the time the bus got back from the match so I could see what else had happened in the world of British football that day!
 

Ali59

Well-Known Member
My dad always bought a programme when he started taking me to games over fifty years ago and its a hobby I have continued home and away .
My collection includes complete sets of home programmes from 1967 ( storage space is a major factor. )
It's sad a team like Hibs end the match day programme, their old programmes from the sixties
always had great action pictures on the front cover.
The overall cost of attending football is also a factor in the possible impact on the decline of sales each year.
 

Wilkinsvolley

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
I think they play a bigger part than just for collectors or something to read at half time. It’s a tangible link to the club for young kids who don’t go to games yet. Dad comes in from the match and gives the programme to his son who starts looking at the pictures then reading about the team and players and wanting to see them for himself, get his own program and scarf etc.
 

erskine bear

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
As a traditionalist, it’s a real shame. I’d be interested in the age demographic of those buying programmes. I wouldn’t imagine too many youngsters pester their parents for one so they’ll undoubtedly be on the decline. I rarely buy one now, I bought every one for our home games in the 3rd division as a kind of ‘this could be a good memory one day’ type thing.
My wee brother (10) has bought one any time I’ve taken him, makes me smile.
 

Texas ranger

Well-Known Member
Are programmes a British thing?

I’ve been to games in Europe, Spain and Italy mainly, and it isn’t a thing. I can remember heading to the Stadio Olimpico in Rome for Lazio v Juve and asking my mate Pino where I could get a programme and he looked at me as if ‘what do you mean?’

Souvenirs for big games, cup finals and tournaments I kinda get, but in reality you are just making a donation to the club in essence aren’t you?
I’d say by far the majority of collectors are British and Irish.
 
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Bordersbear

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
How are folk supposed to check the half time scores if they do not know what letter relate to what games.

The next thing will be banning mobility cars from the trackside.

A complete disgrace The Greens have a lot to answer for.
 

Papa_bear

Active Member
Programmes have had their day. Digital technology makes them redundant.
It’s sad but this is the truth of it. As an older bear I used to always buy a programme, I’m not a collector but it was part of the ritual of going to a game, like having a pie and bovril , in all my years I’ve never tasted bovril or a pie anywhere except at Ibrox. With the internet being invented now and popular, people get information they need off the web and things like newspapers and magazines will all end up online in the future
 

Gilberstoun Bear

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
My Hibee mate (Yes I know, I have a Hibee mate !), has just made me aware Hibs are stopping producing these as from now.

They did not even consult their fans and are using some feeble excuses, such as environmental reasons. (They will not even be publishing a digital programme as a fall back, but have said they will publish a quarterly magazine).

What are your views on this and how would you feel if Rangers went down this road ?
My Hibee mate (Yes I know, I have a Hibee mate !), has just made me aware Hibs are stopping producing these as from now.

They did not even consult their fans and are using some feeble excuses, such as environmental reasons. (They will not even be publishing a digital programme as a fall back, but have said they will publish a quarterly magazine).

What are your views on this and how would you feel if Rangers went down this road ?
Tramps
 

Barrymoped

Well-Known Member
They are pretty out dated now so I can understand why Hibs are doing it.

I’d like to see sales figures now compared with say, 10 and 20 years ago. I used to buy them every game but found they were just collecting dust. I haven’t bought one now in years.
 

Cahoochie

Well-Known Member
Programmes have had their day. Digital technology makes them redundant.
Matos of mine once posed this conundrum:
Your on the train home after a curry.
You dash to the bog, lock the door and , ahhhhh.
Then you find there’s no bog roll.

What would you rather have With you?
1) A Top of the range I Pad
2) The worst book you’ve ever read.
 

jprfc

Well-Known Member
I think they play a bigger part than just for collectors or something to read at half time. It’s a tangible link to the club for young kids who don’t go to games yet. Dad comes in from the match and gives the programme to his son who starts looking at the pictures then reading about the team and players and wanting to see them for himself, get his own program and scarf etc.
Spot on mate, if it wasn't for my old fella bringing me programmes, scarf etc all those years ago I wouldn't have become the bear I am today
 
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