Ousmane Coulibaly, 32, suffers heart attack on pitch

Galstonian Oranje

Well-Known Member
NOT A THREAD ABOUT VACCINES


Far too many of these now. Here's hoping he makes a speedy recovery. I'm sure there are rigorous tests within medicals but something needs to be done to try and pick up these issues.


Mali star Ousmane Coulibaly, 32, suffers heart attack on pitch and given emergency medical attention as match abandoned

MALI star Ousmane Coulibaly has suffered a heart attack during a league game in Qatar.

The 16-cap international was playing for Al Wakrah during their QNB Stars League clash with Al Rayyan.

But in horrifying scenes, Coulibaly, 32, collapsed late in the first half.

Panicked medics rushed onto the pitch with the game temporarily halted.

After realising the severity of the issue, the match was eventually abandoned, awarded as a 1-0 win for Al Rayyan, the scoreline at the time of Coulibaly's collapse.

After the game, a league statement confirmed Coulibaly - who spent 12 years playing in Europe - had suffered a heart attack.

It read: "During the QNB Stars League match between Al Rayyan and Al Wakrah on Saturday, Ousmane Coulibaly suffered a heart attack which required the intervention of medical and ambulance staff present at the venue.

"It may be noted that the player is currently receiving necessary medical care and attention.


"The Qatar Stars League wishes the player a fast recovery, and we would like to thank the medical staff of both teams, paramedics and doctors for their great efforts during such events.

"Regarding the status of the match, it was agreed to end it and complete the remaining time later starting with the score when it was stopped (1-0 in favour of Al Rayyan)."

The Qatar Players Association were quick to wish Coulibaly well.

They tweeted: "Get well soon Ousmane Coulibaly."

Right-back Coulibaly's collapse is the latest in a worrying trend of elite footballers suffering heart problems.

Last summer, Christian Eriksen collapsed during Denmark's Euro 2020 clash with Finland and hasn't played a competitive game since after being fitted with an ICD.

Manchester City legend Sergio Aguero was forced to retire just weeks into his time at Barcelona with a heart issue of his own.

Manchester United star Victor Lindelof complained of discomfort during last month's game against Norwich and was withdrawn as a precaution.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg, with ex-United star Will Keane recently opening up about Charlie Wyke's 'horrendous' cardiac arrest.

Coulibaly played for French sides Guingamp and Brest early in his career, before playing for Greek teams Platanais and Panathinaikos.

He joined Al Wakrah in 2019 but was not picked for his nation's Africa Cup of Nations squad, with the tournament starting on Sunday.
 
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Gibraltar Loyal

Well-Known Member
Bloody hell. Hope everything turns out OK for him.

The last years or so there seems to be more and more heart issues affecting players, or maybe just seems that way.

Is there any link to having had COVID that would put pressure on the heart? Would imagine a fair chunk of people will have had it by now.
Think the world we live in now we know more about stuff like this tbf. 15 - 20 years ago we wouldnt know about football in Qatar.
That aside, hope he makes a full recovery.
 

Badger

Well-Known Member
Today's sport is full of sports science, clean eating and generally just far higher standards of fitness yet this seems to grow more and and more common. It's almost like clubs should encourage smoking, binge drinking and unhealthy diet.

Has it always been an issue and just not reported on as much?
 

Rangersnumberfour

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Today's sport is full of sports science, clean eating and generally just far higher standards of fitness yet this seems to grow more and and more common. It's almost like clubs should encourage smoking, binge drinking and unhealthy diet.

Has it always been an issue and just not reported on as much?
I sometimes think if it could be that their bodies are getting pushed too much to the limits.
 

UnionCruiser72

Well-Known Member
Today's sport is full of sports science, clean eating and generally just far higher standards of fitness yet this seems to grow more and and more common. It's almost like clubs should encourage smoking, binge drinking and unhealthy diet.

Has it always been an issue and just not reported on as much?

I think a large amount of football players these days will be on stuff to increase their endurance etc.

They’ve been caught in other stuff like the olympics so why not football? Think there’s been a few good articles about PED’s in football.
 

Badger

Well-Known Member
I sometimes think if it could be that their bodies are getting pushed too much to the limits.
That's exactly what the sports science is supposed to pick up on. It has to be something along those lines though, far too many of late for it to be coincidental.

Having said that, I am working of the assumption that sports scientists in question are good at what they do and that the player and/ or coaching staff follow their instructions.
 

sw26

Well-Known Member
I sometimes think if it could be that their bodies are getting pushed too much to the limits.

Got to think this is definitely a factor. Players who are regularly picked for international teams especially get next to no breaks nowadays, particularly in the last few years with the disruption to schedules due to the pandemic.

There’s only so much the human body can take.
 

Badger

Well-Known Member
I think a large amount of football players these days will be on stuff to increase their endurance etc.

They’ve been caught in other stuff like the olympics so why not football? Think there’s been a few good articles about PED’s in football.
I wouldn't rule it out. EPO was rife in the cycling world, and that was after they had brought in drug testing. They simply didn't know what to test for for years. There's no reason why there isn't some new undetectable drug that is having adverse affects on people.

With all the money in the game, you can certainly see why someone would be willing to take something to give them the edge over others.
 

Stuart_WATP

Well-Known Member
Happening more and more in recent times. That incident with Eriksen at the Euros was horrendous I really feared the worst watching that.
 

Forza_Napoli

Well-Known Member
I think a large amount of football players these days will be on stuff to increase their endurance etc.

They’ve been caught in other stuff like the olympics so why not football? Think there’s been a few good articles about PED’s in football.
There's going to be something about this issue that comes out this year the amount of caffeine footballers are taking is extremely dangerous
 

iaatpies

Well-Known Member
Football is a far higher intensity game now than it was even 20 years ago. The physical intensity of the game now is incomparable to previous generations. It's no real surprise that the massively increased physical demands of the modern game mean that more players are experiencing serious health complications. The stress placed on players bodies due to modern football is incredible.
 

insanicdrunk

Well-Known Member
And FIFA want to increase the WC to every two years, UEFA wull do that with the Euros so no rest for top players. Players play more and at least we should see is 5 subs.
 

Bearsdenloyal

Well-Known Member
Get well soon.

I remeber eire at USA 94 playing in horrendous heats and jack Charlton going mental at the fifa official as he wanted his players to get water on the pitch
 

strider

Well-Known Member
You think professional football pushes 'athletes' bodies to the limit?

It absolutely does. Most sports don't have anywhere near the demands of football in terms of physicality, endurance and strain on the body.

I agree with a number of people on this thread - professional players are taking risks they don't realise with all the stimulants and energy stuff they use to try and get that extra few percent out of themselves.
 

Louch

Well-Known Member
With the amount of money in football there is probably some very high level doping going on that is outside of testing criteria. Look how cycling managed it with a fraction of the money. Or people pushing their body so far out with its ability that it crashes on them like we see with heart issues.
 

QueensferryCR3Bear

Well-Known Member
Shocking. Hopefully he is alright and makes a full recovery.

Are footballers tuning, conditioning, selectively feeding and pushing their bodies too far from too young now?
 

coolatballet

Well-Known Member
This is a pretty common mistake, this notion that playing amateur or junior level is anywhere near as demanding as professional football is now.

It used to be a bit closer, it's nowhere near it now.

Do not agree with you at all. Try looking at Triathletes or Iron Man type events if you want to discuss demanding sports.

Are we talking 10/12k running over 90 minutes in a game of football?

Even if you were to analyse it, what would you hope to achieve? Maybe £20k per week footballers being only permitted to play once every 7 days?

Think of our forebears in the mines and trenches. They had none of the benefits of modern diet, wealth or medical care.
 

insanicdrunk

Well-Known Member
Do not agree with you at all. Try looking at Triathletes or Iron Man type events if you want to discuss demanding sports.

Are we talking 10/12k running over 90 minutes in a game of football?

Even if you were to analyse it, what would you hope to achieve? Maybe £20k per week footballers being only permitted to play once every 7 days?

Think of our forebears in the mines and trenches. They had none of the benefits of modern diet, wealth or medical care.
and a lot of the died young.
 

FollowNearAndFar

Well-Known Member
It absolutely does. Most sports don't have anywhere near the demands of football in terms of physicality, endurance and strain on the body.

I agree with a number of people on this thread - professional players are taking risks they don't realise with all the stimulants and energy stuff they use to try and get that extra few percent out of themselves.
Try a combat sport professionally then tell me how demanding professional football is on the body.
 

Louch

Well-Known Member
Do not agree with you at all. Try looking at Triathletes or Iron Man type events if you want to discuss demanding sports.

Are we talking 10/12k running over 90 minutes in a game of football?

Even if you were to analyse it, what would you hope to achieve? Maybe £20k per week footballers being only permitted to play once every 7 days?

Think of our forebears in the mines and trenches. They had none of the benefits of modern diet, wealth or medical care.
Iron man and triathletes do events every few months , not twice a week

And check the life expectancy of those in mines, they weren’t making it to retirement more often than not
 

Guerilla

Well-Known Member
There's going to be something about this issue that comes out this year the amount of caffeine footballers are taking is extremely dangerous
Or some new stimulant. If anyone has ever used ephedrine for example it can push u beyond your limits. Its a bit old school and probably tested for though but not to say something else isn’t around.
 

coolatballet

Well-Known Member
Iron man and triathletes do events every few months , not twice a week

And check the life expectancy of those in mines, they weren’t making it to retirement more often than not
A lot of soldiers in the trenches did not qualify for their bus passes. That is exactly my point.

Sorry, but if you try to convince me of the mortal peril caused to professional players of two or three games of football a week then I will laugh in you face.

If you had anything like convincing argument then they would be dropping like flies, but they' re not and you don't.
Which is kinda the point of the thread. There seems to be a lot of heart issues creeping in.
No there's not.
 

mdingwall

Administrator
I disagree. To compete at a high level you cover every aspect of fitness (more than a football player) and could quite easily clock up more running miles in a week than a pro football player.

The impact on muscles is on a far higher scale.
You might disagree but you would be wrong so to do. In rugby league, for instance, you play at a high intensity but you give and receive plenty of contact. You can’t compare that with someone as slight as Jamie Vardy.
 

mdingwall

Administrator
A lot of soldiers in the trenches did not qualify for their bus passes. That is exactly my point.

Sorry, but if you try to convince me of the mortal peril caused to professional players of two or three games of football a week then I will laugh in you face.

If you had anything like convincing argument then they would be dropping like flies, but they' re not and you don't.

No there's not.
That’s because the military age is 18-30.
 

East Bear

Active Member
It absolutely does. Most sports don't have anywhere near the demands of football in terms of physicality, endurance and strain on the body.

I agree with a number of people on this thread - professional players are taking risks they don't realise with all the stimulants and energy stuff they use to try and get that extra few percent out of themselves.
I can’t agree with this I’m afraid. There are numerous sports (triathlon/cycling/rowing/distance running) where the physical stress on the body and training volume is far in excess of football. I’m not saying pro football isn’t intense, but I think it’s ‘stress’ is more on joints/ligaments than the cardiovascular system (when compared to many other sports).
 

FollowNearAndFar

Well-Known Member
You might disagree but you would be wrong so to do. In rugby league, for instance, you play at a high intensity but you give and receive plenty of contact. You can’t compare that with someone as slight as Jamie Vardy.
For what reason & points do you believe pro footballers put there body through more physical damage than high level combat sports?

These people play at high intensity once, maybe twice a week.

Not 5 days a week.
 
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