Pictorial map of Glasgow, early 1960s

mdingwall

Administrator
Pictorial map of Glasgow, early 1960s

Glasgow at it's height. Shipyards and ship quays full of orders and punters with coin in their pockets. Churches full. And still over a million people in the city.

q7sQ1Ip.jpg


YZPnHRt.jpg


R3eocBI.jpg


wtZrxiT.jpg
 
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Stanley

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting. Excellent find. However, my guess is that the map is later than early ’50’s. Firstly, Sir Basil Faulty’s (sic) flats in the Gorbals were built 60-62. Secondly, didn’t the trams stop running in the autumn of ’62? If so, that is why trams are not shown on the map. Possibly 63 or 64? Who can give a more precise answer?
 

nybear

Well-Known Member
No Beardmores when you think the role it played during the war. but carntyne dug track made it
 
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Fife flyer

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting. Excellent find. However, my guess is that the map is later than early ’50’s. Firstly, Sir Basil Faulty’s (sic) flats in the Gorbals were built 60-62. Secondly, didn’t the trams stop running in the autumn of ’62? If so, that is why trams are not shown on the map. Possibly 63 or 64? Who can give a more precise answer?
Re my earlier post I remember it from around 1965- 1969 at school but don’t know how old it was by then
 

mfgorm

Well-Known Member
Speaking as someone who has minimal familiarity with the geography of Glasgow, what do you guys notice has changed most?
The flattening of areas like Anderston and Townhead on the edge of the city centre which have never really been fully replaced. Some of it was to accommodate the motorway.
 

mfgorm

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting. Excellent find. However, my guess is that the map is later than early ’50’s. Firstly, Sir Basil Faulty’s (sic) flats in the Gorbals were built 60-62. Secondly, didn’t the trams stop running in the autumn of ’62? If so, that is why trams are not shown on the map. Possibly 63 or 64? Who can give a more precise answer?
Would reckon between 64 and 67. The Museum of Transport opened in 1964, Third Lanark are on the map and they went defunct in 1967.
Edit: make that 65, the Central Low Level (Argyle) line isn't on it. That closed October 1964.
 
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Fife flyer

Well-Known Member
The flattening of areas like Anderston and Townhead on the edge of the city centre which have never really been fully replaced. Some of it was to accommodate the motorway.
Biggest change is the motorway itself. And the pedestrianisation of shopping streets in city centre
 

alex wright

Well-Known Member
Speaking as someone who has minimal familiarity with the geography of Glasgow, what do you guys notice has changed most?

The only areas on the Southside where I can lose my bearings based on the old layouts are around Nitshill, Priesthill etc and Oatlands.
 

Blaew

Well-Known Member
When I was a kid the tennements and most public buildings were all black because of the build up of soot.

The 1980s campaign to sandblast everything made some difference.
When I was young and on my first visit to Glasgow I pointed out a black building to my Dad and said why is that so filthy and I remember him saying that in his day everything was that colour.

This was in the late 90s around the James Watt/Brown St area of Argyle Street. Must have been a building that missed out on the clean for some reason or another.
 

Jan Wyck

Well-Known Member
When I was a kid the tennements and most public buildings were all black because of the build up of soot.

The 1980s campaign to sandblast everything made some difference.

:))

I was astonished in my early twenties that all those black tenements of my youth were really red sandstone and blonde sandstone.

White City on Friday nights for the Glasgow Tigers speedway and Saturday night with my Old Man and Granda for the greyhounds. Magic memories and Ibrox Stadium at the bottom of my street.

Never heard Ibrox swimming baths called by that name before. Always knew it as Summerton Rd swimming baths.
 

isawthat

Well-Known Member
Unbelievable the amount of changes since I first started to follow follow. The docks were always full and cargo being unloaded as our bus made its way to Ibrox.
The Gorbals and other areas urgently required regenerated, but the way they were just flattened tore the heart out of the city.
 

possil bear

Active Member
Good post Mark as a kid we climbed over the wall at Ruchill hospital to play on their grass football pitch only thing was it was some slope. Cheers good memories.
 

esemsea

Well-Known Member
Definitely 60’s the “Hampden Bowl” was opened by Brunswick about 1962 if I remember.
I was the first to hit the rake arm when told not to.Total riddy
 

Neilstonger

Well-Known Member
Apart from Ibrox, it’s the names of the three greyhound stadiums that resonate with me: White City; Shawfield and Carntyne. My dad went to the dugs every Saturday night for years and it was always one of those three.
 

SingingCorner

Active Member
Apart from Ibrox, it’s the names of the three greyhound stadiums that resonate with me: White City; Shawfield and Carntyne. My dad went to the dugs every Saturday night for years and it was always one of those three.
When would Carntyne and White City have lasted to?
 

toobl

Well-Known Member
Fascinating to view this, especially that you can roughly see part of the route of the M8 which replaced the canal. Also things like the STV studio in the town, Parliamentary Road and the Clydeside
 

Bearsden Bear

Well-Known Member
A piece of useless to trivia to add here . . .

If you draw a straight line from Parkhead to Hampden, it goes straight through Shawfield, which is already also split by the Glasgow/Rutherglen border.
 

gersfanal

Well-Known Member
Pictorial map of Glasgow, early 1950s

Glasgow at it's height. Shipyards and ship quays full of orders and punters with coin in their pockets. Churches full. And still over a million people in the city.

q7sQ1Ip.jpg


YZPnHRt.jpg


R3eocBI.jpg


wtZrxiT.jpg

Thanks Mark

A fantastically interesting post !

Is there any way you could create a downloadable item/file for these pictures which I, for one, would be delighted to have - a donation to FF or RFC ?
 

ChrisWoods

Well-Known Member
Royal Mental Hospital !

I grew up across the railway from Gartnaval, they used to regularly test the fire alarm and anytime we heard it as kids we said that's the alarm for someone escaping from the 'loony bin'
 

OnTheWay

Active Member
Would reckon between 64 and 67. The Museum of Transport opened in 1964, Third Lanark are on the map and they went defunct in 1967.
Edit: make that 65, the Central Low Level (Argyle) line isn't on it. That closed October 1964.
Impressive.
 

Tormusk1872

Well-Known Member
Six teams in the city back then.
Nice to see Thirds on the map!
Five and a half, as you can see the City boundary runs right through the middle of Shawfield, which is why Clyde in 1968 claimed they were a Rutherglen club and not a Glasgow one, after UEFA refused them entry to the Fair Cities Cup. Only one team from a City could enter the Fair Cities Cup, Rangers were second in League and got a place, Clyde who finished third should have got in as well but UEFA deemed them to be a Glasgow club and they missed out.
 
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