Public consultation on new flats at Ibrox

deedle

Well-Known Member
imagine if 50k people all tried to park near the stadium. Cars are too inefficient and will never be the solution
Public transport has limitations when it comes to getting 50,000 to and from Ibrox. Realistically, how far from Ibrox can you travel after 10:00 pm if you don’t have a car or not relying on a supporters’ bus?

The idea of reactivating Ibrox station to carry fans suffers from the drawback of timetable constraints.
 

Belvedre

Well-Known Member
Public transport has limitations when it comes to getting 50,000 to and from Ibrox. Realistically, how far from Ibrox can you travel after 10:00 pm if you don’t have a car or not relying on a supporters’ bus?

The idea of reactivating Ibrox station to carry fans suffers from the drawback of timetable constraints.
Yes it certainly does in its current state because Glasweigan transit investment has been horrible as cars have long been prioritized. Which is why development around Ibrox is crucial as it reduces travel demand.

The long term involves refreshed transit investment, but that isn't possible if residential densities are the level they are. Supporter busses are fine but providing parking for private cars is expensive (land is valuable and parking consumes large amounts of land) , and creates congestion. Eliminating private parking may seem shortsighted but it's quite progressive long term.
 

iaatpies

Well-Known Member
Public transport has limitations when it comes to getting 50,000 to and from Ibrox. Realistically, how far from Ibrox can you travel after 10:00 pm if you don’t have a car or not relying on a supporters’ bus?

The idea of reactivating Ibrox station to carry fans suffers from the drawback of timetable constraints.
There is no one option for getting people to and from Ibrox. Better connection via rail would mean improvements for those travelling south of the Clyde via Glasgow Central. That potentially takes pressure off the subway for those travelling north to hubs like Partick or Buchanan St. The ability to connect better with public transport for the greater Glasgow area takes pressure off the roads for those who drive.

Public transport improvements would have a significant benefit for drivers or those who use supporters buses as it would undoubtedly take some traffic away and potentially free up parking provision.
 

mfgorm

Well-Known Member
The thing I'm concerned about is the loss of the car parking space combined with the proposed restrictions around the ground.
The station reopening would be a good thing, but what about making the test track that's been built for the new Subway trains permanent and using the platfom as a station on match days.
 

Tony75tfc

Well-Known Member
Public transport has limitations when it comes to getting 50,000 to and from Ibrox. Realistically, how far from Ibrox can you travel after 10:00 pm if you don’t have a car or not relying on a supporters’ bus?

The idea of reactivating Ibrox station to carry fans suffers from the drawback of timetable constraints.
Hopefully once the driverless trains come into effect in 2021 the subway will be open later or even better all night
 

MO BLUE

Member
Would be cool if the club owned a bunch of units and rented them out around match days especially European nights
 

Elvis

Well-Known Member
So at the moment this is a consultation. Therefore the public can respond to the proposals put forward and have their say. The consultation responses will then be used to shape the final planning application. Be careful what you write and be sure to state clearly if you object (and in planning terms). An unscrupulous developer will use anything to show support. Use the live Q&A session to push them on things like a viable transport plan in support of the application, how they mitigate noise and congestion on match days, etc.
 

Greebo

Well-Known Member
Does any one think this is a good idea ?
If it's true that the club are selling some land I can only assume that the money is needed. Perhaps for something specific. So I assume the board think it's a good idea or they wouldn't be doing it.

Without knowing the reason, and more importantly the amount it's difficult for anyone else to say if it's a good idea or not.
 

Now and forever

Well-Known Member
If it's true that the club are selling some land I can only assume that the money is needed. Perhaps for something specific. So I assume the board think it's a good idea or they wouldn't be doing it.

Without knowing the reason, and more importantly the amount it's difficult for anyone else to say if it's a good idea or not.
Its a terrible idea if true.

It looks horrendous and takes away scope to expand the club.
 

Ali59

Well-Known Member
But you’ve got every numpty on here blaming the “cooncil” for “blocking us in”
The planners/council may block the application as the ground was never residential land, plus various sites available nearby which were previously houses.
If they think Rangers will make a few million on the deal it will be blocked.
 

Whitburnbear

Well-Known Member
Should point out that proposal is on the exact footprint of the albion dog track that was on the site. So it's possibly a reflection of that and in sympathy with our stadium. Hmm maybe not so bad
 

Mr Blue Sky

Active Member
Was there not a rumour that we couldn’t open the club deck if the Albion parking wasn’t available? May have been a tarrier rumour but it kind of rings a bell.
 

clubdeckcharlie

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Was there not a rumour that we couldn’t open the club deck if the Albion parking wasn’t available? May have been a tarrier rumour but it kind of rings a bell.
L think that's right. It was a planning condition. There will still be a car park, albeit smaller.
 

laudrup94

Active Member
Be good to get this done. All of outside Ibrox looks outdated so this would help with pavings etc and smarten the area right up. Wouldn’t lose a lot of parking spaces I wouldn’t think due to planning legislation. This and Edmiston House project - Rangers doing stuff. Great tae see
 
My brother got access to a disabled parking pass for the night of the Hamilton game. The only good thing about that night was the short walk from the west enclosure to the corner of the Albion car park. Without the pass he couldn’t have managed his first game in 9 months.

If you wait till the end of the match, the usual 20 minute walk to the car (soon to be longer with the new radius restriction,) and then sometimes an hour wait to get onto the M8 on mid week night, was halved and we were on the motorway in no time.
We parked slap bang on the corner where the flats are going. Let’s hope this has been thought through properly.
Same here, my Dad is 75 and has mobility issues (bad knees), we HAVE to park in the Albion. He cannot now walk a mile or two from a supporters bus or from Bellahouston.

If the Albion is sold, even half of it, a man who went to his first game in 1950 may not ever be able to go again.
 

Robert Marshall

Well-Known Member
Given the p



In current economic climate you’d imagine land might be cheap. We would need to do something with the land though. I think buying land around the subway makes more sense if we are trading part of the car park. But who knows what’s happening!
Can you point me towards this cheap land you refer too?
 
Do you not see a connection between spending enormous sums of money on parking and a lack of transit investment? Glasgow has spent the last 50 years pandering to the car and adopting American suburbanization patterns. The Bruce Report has been a disaster for Glasgow.

Parking is enormously expensive to construct (minimum 4k per space) and is empty most of the time. That's particularly true for a football car park that faces very significant peaks.

No one is forcing you to use public transit, they are just no longer subsidizing the car and it's associated urban design which contributed as much to Glasgow's downfall as deindustrialization did.

If we want land values to appreciate and for development to occur in Govan, getting rid of inefficient parking lots is a great first step.
The initial Bruce report had the entire city centre flattened. Kid you not. Everything.
 

Careca

Well-Known Member
Yes it certainly does in its current state because Glasweigan transit investment has been horrible as cars have long been prioritized. Which is why development around Ibrox is crucial as it reduces travel demand.

The long term involves refreshed transit investment, but that isn't possible if residential densities are the level they are. Supporter busses are fine but providing parking for private cars is expensive (land is valuable and parking consumes large amounts of land) , and creates congestion. Eliminating private parking may seem shortsighted but it's quite progressive long term.
All very Jetsons. Will these progressive new flats have parking spaces?

Development reduces travel demand. For who? Not the fans. 50000 need to get to the games regardless of how developed the area around Ibrox is.

I wouldn’t expect to drive around looking for a parking space for 10 minutes, walk 20 minutes across dark paths, through puddles and over motorway ramps, avoiding getting knocked down by frustrated bumper to bumper traffic, in the rain on a freezing Wednesday night in November to go to the Odeon. Only to repeat the same walk on the way back, to wait another half hour to move off on the drive home. That’s the reality of the new parking restrictions on a typical midweek game and we seem to be getting more of those games lately.

We are in the entertainment business. We make the majority of our money from ticket sales. The club need to be careful they don’t give fans another excuse not to leave the hassle behind and watch EVERY game from the comfort of their own couch.
 

Belvedre

Well-Known Member
All very Jetsons. Will these progressive new flats have parking spaces?

Development reduces travel demand. For who? Not the fans. 50000 need to get to the games regardless of how developed the area around Ibrox is.

I wouldn’t expect to drive around looking for a parking space for 10 minutes, walk 20 minutes across dark paths, through puddles and over motorway ramps, avoiding getting knocked down by frustrated bumper to bumper traffic, in the rain on a freezing Wednesday night in November to go to the Odeon. Only to repeat the same walk on the way back, to wait another half hour to move off on the drive home. That’s the reality of the new parking restrictions on a typical midweek game and we seem to be getting more of those games lately.

We are in the entertainment business. We make the majority of our money from ticket sales. The club need to be careful they don’t give fans another excuse not to leave the hassle behind and watch EVERY game from the comfort of their own couch.
I work in NA so i'm unfamiliar with Glaswegian parking requirements for residential development but yes probably they will, and if the market dictates that parking spaces are desired, they will be included.

Development reduces travel demand by increasing density which allows for a greater mix of uses in close proximity. Certainly many Rangers fans would purchase units in a building that close to Ibrox.

Everything you described is due to Glasgow's adoption of the American automobile induced urban design! Would you rather do that or walk to your flat down the road or nearby? More parking will never eliminate that journey, it's the reality of using an inefficient mode like a car. Imagine if all 50k people drove down to Ibrox and needed a parking space. Using standard UK parking sizes of 8 ft by 16 ft. Multiply that by 50k and we would need 1 square kilometre just for parking that is only used once every two weeks. What an enormous waste of land and money that would be. Parking is expensive, minimum of 4k per space without even including the externalities of increased congestion and emissions. Parking is not and will never be the answer.

Eliminating parking requirements makes it easier for the average fan to get into and out of Ibrox. Cars are the sole cause of congestion. Glasgow desperately needs to invest more in transit but that isn't feasible if we don't prioritize infill urban development and upzone.
 

Careca

Well-Known Member
I appreciate what your saying but getting to entertainment by car is the reality the world over. Especially if you don’t start with a blank canvas and invest billions in public transport.

It’s simple. Midweek. Thousands of our fans need to drive straight after work or they can’t go. They need to park somewhere. Preferably somewhere close to where the have paid £500 plus a year minimum to enjoy themselves. Somewhere like a whacking great club owned car park at the corner of the ground.
 

Alexmci

Well-Known Member
Whats the bet the Council will insist it's used for Social Housing.
I would imagine that the properties would be a mix of social housing and mid market, any of these developments usually need to have a percentage of social housing before they are given local authority planning consent.
 

laud55

Active Member
Somewhere like a whacking great club owned car park at the corner of the ground.
That is one way of looking at it. I have bitter experience of trying to get out of on-site car parks at the SECC/Hydro.

Large events need a variety of dispersal methods and routes particularly when those attending come from distance.
 

Jmacca1975

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
The planners/council may block the application as the ground was never residential land, plus various sites available nearby which were previously houses.
If they think Rangers will make a few million on the deal it will be blocked.
I’m talking about people stating that “they” (the council) are trying to “physically” block us in!
 

Valley Bluenose

Well-Known Member
It’s been a few years since I used to park in The Albion. Absolute f*cking nightmare to get out of. Quickly sacked it for street parking anywhere I could find it. That’s got more difficult now but, when I get to Ibrox, we always manage something at the Copland Road end. Somewhere.
 
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