Rangers Single Malt

AppleBear

Well-Known Member
You really haven't got a clue sonny. Huv ye?
People in the know have made valid points but you just poo hoo them
Neither me or the poster who made a comment re bottle presentation and such like have discouraged anyone not to purchase said item. Stick to commenting on something you know a little about.
Dial back the tone. You don’t know anything about me.

It’s absolutely not a valid point to claim this hasn’t been well-executed when it’s sold out within minutes of release.

Stick to picking fights you can win, pal.
 

The Blue Sea

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Cost of goods on this incl duty is about £15 - I work in whisky and this is accurate

So that leaves £60 profit per bottle to share between both parties, circa £20k

Hardly life changing amounts but a nice earner nonetheless

I would actually like to see them go further with a 25-30 YO and charge £500 a bottle. If Douglas Laing have the stock then costs wouldn’t be much different so profit becomes £150k between RFC and DL
 

Thern7

Well-Known Member
Yeah, really poor execution. That’s why it sold out within minutes of going on sale.
Our home top sold out in minutes also and would be considered by most as a poorly executed activation with quality and delivery issues. Quality execution and sales are two very different things. I would buy a Rangers whisky in a heartbeat. I wouldn't buy this, which means they are leaving money on the table.

Have a great weekend.
 

BothwellBear

Well-Known Member
Cost of goods on this incl duty is about £15 - I work in whisky and this is accurate

So that leaves £60 profit per bottle to share between both parties, circa £20k

Hardly life changing amounts but a nice earner nonetheless

I would actually like to see them go further with a 25-30 YO and charge £500 a bottle. If Douglas Laing have the stock then costs wouldn’t be much different so profit becomes £150k between RFC and DL
This. Still shocked commercially we haven’t absolutely hammered the bevvy angle given its Scotland.
 

Parahandy65

Well-Known Member
I feel this is a positive move from the club. I've read with interest differing views on costs, etc. For me the proof is in the pudding, this limited edition sold out in a couple of hours so demand is there for products of this nature within our support.
I appreciate it's not for everyone, but the club should be maximising our merchandising revenue and this is another small step in generating addition funds. Similar to the recent partnership with Titleist golf balls, there will probably be a premium to pay for these products if the club are to make money from them. I'm at an age now where wearing football shirts, other than around the house isn't so appealing - whereas buying products like these knowing money is going into the club to help improve the team is something I'm keen to do.
Hopefully the club continue to expand the range of products bearing the club name, extra revenue and increased brand exposure is a winner for me.
Might be an idea if we were to launch a partnership for Rangers champagne, got a feeling there could be a fair demand for this in the not to distant future if the team keep up the good work!
 

MarkWalters11

Well-Known Member
Not accurate at all .
They make their own casks and and store them in their own warehouses.It is then bottled in their own bottling halls.
I only said it costs 50p to produce a litre of spirit. Yes of course there are overheads.
But think you missed my point l wouldn't pay that for a bottle which associated with our club boosts the price up.
I don’t think your company make your own casks. Casks come from first fill bourbon used in the states and by law only used once. The second are Spanish Sherry butts or hogsheads, which means your company cannot make them, maybe you mean repair them if they own a Cooperage.
Again if your company deal is a mass produced product the price will be more reasonable but this is a limited edition single cask meaning the price is always going to be higher due to its rarity.
Glenrothes is also a an excellent whisky so I am not shocked by the price.
 
Last edited:

Teddy bear

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Gutted I missed this, would have bought a couple.
I found a wee box in my parents cupboard, it has a Rangers branded Bellis miniature and a Rangers whisky glas
Cracking wee set, would love to know how old it is.
 

GavCo

Well-Known Member
Cost of goods on this incl duty is about £15 - I work in whisky and this is accurate

So that leaves £60 profit per bottle to share between both parties, circa £20k

Hardly life changing amounts but a nice earner nonetheless

I would actually like to see them go further with a 25-30 YO and charge £500 a bottle. If Douglas Laing have the stock then costs wouldn’t be much different so profit becomes £150k between RFC and DL
As an individual amount its not life changing but they are doing 3 bottlings potentially taking it up to 60k and that is just for whisky. Then they can do Gin and Rum and then we are near 200k in alcohol sales and that's just one market.
We seem to be doing really well at picking good partnerships that so far aren't devaluing our brand.

Next up, Rangers Craft Beers, Blue Molton Brown Shower gel, and Rangers songs on vinyl :D
 

senefelder

Well-Known Member
Douglas Laing specialise in Single Cask bottling.
I'm pretty sure this will be a good one.
I believe it's a Glenrothes. If so, and if Speyside whiskies are your bag, then I would think it will be very good. The fact that it's single cask will also be a factor in determining the cost.
 

A1bertz

Well-Known Member
I believe it's a Glenrothes. If so, and if Speyside whiskies are your bag, then I would think it will be very good. The fact that it's single cask will also be a factor in determining the cost.
What's does a single cask mean when it comes to taste/quality?
 

GavCo

Well-Known Member
What's does a single cask mean when it comes to taste/quality?
It doesn't necessarily mean better but if you accept that every cask has its own unique characteristics then a bottle from one cask is unique and the flavours stand out more. If you get a normal bottle that has come from several casks then you are getting an average of all those flavours and characteristics from all the casks.

Typically the casks used for single casks are the ones the distiller has picked out as being the best from a batch the rest would normally go into normal bottles or blends.
 

Kingging

Well-Known Member
Seems a lot to put RFC on the label of a bottle. I could get a Caol Ila 18 years old for £80 or two or three bottles of most 12 years old quality malts for the same price. I doubt the label will give it the rarity value that makes it a good investment either but I could be wrong
 

MarkWalters11

Well-Known Member
It's the fact that at 75 pounds for a 13 year old single that is the criticism. I can buy a 15 year old single malt for half the price at 43 proof , the fact that there limited amount available is neither here nor there, for a 13 year old single malt the price is excessive. At the end of the day it's a whisky bottle with a label with the Rangers name on it.
It’s £ 75 pounds for a rare and limited edition whisky which as it is single cask means it will be non chill- filtered and natural colour unlike a lot of distillery bottlings. It’s expensive but not over priced I am just pointing out why it’s higher than an off the shelf supermarket Auchentoshan or Aberlour.
 

Johansen

Well-Known Member
It’s £ 75 pounds for a rare and limited edition whisky which as it is single cask means it will be non chill- filtered and natural colour unlike a lot of distillery bottlings. It’s expensive but not over priced I am just pointing out why it’s higher than an off the shelf supermarket Auchentoshan or Aberlour.
Limited edition is nonsense mate, any distillery can and do put the mantle of limited edition, however those malts are usually 25 years old or over, priced into the thousands in many cases. That malt will be sold because it has the Rangers label on it and not because of the rarity of the age. As a malt drinker I can state that there are just as good or better malts around the 14/15/ year mark for a more realistic price and not off a supermarket shelf either. I can understand why bluenoses will buy it but not at that price for me
 

MarkWalters11

Well-Known Member
Limited edition is nonsense mate, any distillery can and do put the mantle of limited edition, however those malts are usually 25 years old or over, priced into the thousands in many cases. That malt will be sold because it has the Rangers label on it and not because of the rarity of the age. As a malt drinker I can state that there are just as good or better malts around the 14/15/ year mark for a more realistic price and not off a supermarket shelf either. I can understand why bluenoses will buy it but not at that price for me
I agree there will be better drams for a better price. I love Clynelish 14 yo which is a distillery bottling for around 44 pounds. The fact is is vatted with 400 casks to get the quantity Diageo need to supply world trade means it is is not limited edition though. This DL Glenrothes is limited edition as it is single cask. 340 bottles in the world. Is it a better whisky than the clynelish , probably not but that is a reason companies can charge the extra mark
Up because of its number of bottles.
 

MightyGersLand!

Well-Known Member
It's the fact that at 75 pounds for a 13 year old single that is the criticism. I can buy a 15 year old single malt for half the price at 43 proof , the fact that there limited amount available is neither here nor there, for a 13 year old single malt the price is excessive. At the end of the day it's a whisky bottle with a label with the Rangers name on it.
I could buy my wean a blue t-shirt.
The price of a strip is excessive if we weren't Rangers fans.

But we are.
The whisky co need to make a profit, Rangers want a quid or 2 also or what's the point.

I'm a fan and gutted I missed out on a bottle.
If you don't want a bottle don't buy it.
For what it is I'd have loved to get 2.
One for keeping and one for drinking.
 

govanrear1987

Well-Known Member
Seems a lot to put RFC on the label of a bottle. I could get a Caol Ila 18 years old for £80 or two or three bottles of most 12 years old quality malts for the same price. I doubt the label will give it the rarity value that makes it a good investment either but I could be wrong
Caol is one whisky I cant drink
 

govanrear1987

Well-Known Member
Fair enough. Islay malts are very different from Speysides and not for everyone. Caol Ila is my favourite and the 18 year old is sublime to my palate
I like a mix of myself, even laphroig or lagavulin but didn’t enjoy Caol.

As you say, each individual likes something a bit different
 

AppleBear

Well-Known Member
It's the fact that at 75 pounds for a 13 year old single that is the criticism. I can buy a 15 year old single malt for half the price at 43 proof , the fact that there limited amount available is neither here nor there, for a 13 year old single malt the price is excessive. At the end of the day it's a whisky bottle with a label with the Rangers name on it.
That's capitalism. You could apply this logic of yours to any purchase. Say, for example, £65 on a Rangers top which is priced as such because of the badge. It certainly does not have a material value of £65. Maybe £3.

At the end of the day, £75 is a competitive price for this product. End of.
 

Johansen

Well-Known Member
That's capitalism. You could apply this logic of yours to any purchase. Say, for example, £65 on a Rangers top which is priced as such because of the badge. It certainly does not have a material value of £65. Maybe £3.

At the end of the day, £75 is a competitive price for this product. End of.
As a malt whisky drinker of many years I can say, imo, it is not a competitive price, take away the Rangers factor, would you pay 75 pounds for a 13 year old single malt, I know I wouldn't but each to their own.
 

MightyGersLand!

Well-Known Member
Spot on buddy. My next door neighbour works in the whisky bond and can get Macallan Gold in a box for £18 ,also Highland Park for £20.Totally get why people might want to spend £75 for the Rangers bottle but I'm the same as you in feeling it's too dear. Each to their own.

That's capitalism. You could apply this logic of yours to any purchase. Say, for example, £65 on a Rangers top which is priced as such because of the badge. It certainly does not have a material value of £65. Maybe £3.

At the end of the day, £75 is a competitive price for this product. End of.

You can argue it's massively under priced.
Any product that sells out in under a day probably is.
 

hurricane_jack

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Our home top sold out in minutes also and would be considered by most as a poorly executed activation with quality and delivery issues. Quality execution and sales are two very different things. I would buy a Rangers whisky in a heartbeat. I wouldn't buy this, which means they are leaving money on the table.

Have a great weekend.
According to Castore (at the focus group), 3% of home shirt orders were returned. That included quality issues and people changing size.

I'd say most people were very happy with the kit launch, it's just social media that makes it seem otherwise.
 

MarkWalters11

Well-Known Member
The Rangers top is probably £5 to make and retails for £60 quid. Creed aftershave is around £250 and probably costs pennies to
Make, this whisky at least took over a decade to get in the bottle so for me there is something a bit special about whisky, as mentioned above, is it going to be the most amazing whisky, probably not but I am happy to support the club in anyway shape or form.
 

AppleBear

Well-Known Member
As a malt whisky drinker of many years I can say, imo, it is not a competitive price, take away the Rangers factor, would you pay 75 pounds for a 13 year old single malt, I know I wouldn't but each to their own.
Likewise, I’ve been drinking largely single malts for a very long time and have quite a nice collection. I wouldn’t routinely pay that for a 13 year old, but there’s much more to this than its age.
 

Johansen

Well-Known Member
Likewise, I’ve been drinking largely single malts for a very long time and have quite a nice collection. I wouldn’t routinely pay that for a 13 year old, but there’s much more to this than its age.
Aye, there probably is, many years ago, 1994 I bought a whisky decanter and glasses with Jock Wallace engraved on them all, bought it at one of his testimonial night's at the Edmiston, it cost 75 pounds one of my prized possessions Rangers related so I can fully understand why bluenoses would buy this malt
 

Thern7

Well-Known Member
According to Castore (at the focus group), 3% of home shirt orders were returned. That included quality issues and people changing size.

I'd say most people were very happy with the kit launch, it's just social media that makes it seem otherwise.
Interesting to know. Although Castore have said many things to set their own narrative so if you choose to believe them then fair enough.

Ultimately I am passionate about Rangers and whisky. I wasn't suggesting fans don't buy this product, I was only participating in a fan forum to suggest that for myself as a professional involved in whisky brand building, the proposition felt lacklustre. The opportunity in this space is massive and I hope they knock it out the park moving forward.
 

GallowgateBlue

Well-Known Member
I agree there will be better drams for a better price. I love Clynelish 14 yo which is a distillery bottling for around 44 pounds. The fact is is vatted with 400 casks to get the quantity Diageo need to supply world trade means it is is not limited edition though. This DL Glenrothes is limited edition as it is single cask. 340 bottles in the world. Is it a better whisky than the clynelish , probably not but that is a reason companies can charge the extra mark
Up because of its number of bottles.
Exactly this. Funny you say that because I too am a big lover of the Clynelish 14. Nothing better than opening up a single cask and savouring it's unique flavour and profile but the Clynelish 14 for the price is an absolute normal drinker. If only we could afford a constant stream of si gle casks. Again you've hit the nail on the head with the reason why and how single cask expressions from good distilleries sell well. We live in a world of exclusivity and that goes hand in hand with whisky at the moment. The only gripe I would have with this release is it is not cask strength. That though is my preference with single casks and I can totally understand their need to lower the ABV.
 
Top