Rangers u17s in russia live on youtube

Stanley Yelnats

Well-Known Member
#5
Nah am I %^*& watching that.

The referee is at it already.

Spartak Moscow in Russia with a Russian ref.

I literally turned the game on for a minute and he gave Spartak two free kicks for no reason whatsoever, while we were attacking.
 

Tony75tfc

Well-Known Member
#16
Rangers have had most of the ball 2nd half but just look inept of ideas going forward ,guilty of overpassing it and final ball is poor
 

elfideldo

Well-Known Member
#24

Back Row:- Lewis McKinnon, Cole McKinnon, Chris McKee, Jay Hogarth, Lewis Budinauckas, Nathan Young-Coombes, Ciaran Dickson, Leon King.

Front Row:- Adam Devine, Matty Yates, Umaro Balde, Kane Ritchie-Hosler, Robbie Fraser, Ryan Muir, Aaron Lyall, Mathew Henderson.

Not in the picture, Czech trialist Krystof Hempl. Alex Lowry not there, guess he didn't travel, also not there are Kai Kennedy who will be playing against Stranraer tonight and Murray Miller who is working his way back to fitness and may be on the bench tonight.
 
#25
The difference in Physicality between the two sides is incredible.Surely they are not in the same age groups
In reality probably not. Officially of course, they are, but youth development at the academy has been accelerated at all levels as far as I'm aware. So Rangers teams at all age groups usually have a younger average age than most of their opponents, usually by at least a year as far as I can tell. Just a quick look at a few random players backs this up. Some are 15, most have just turned 16. I assume most of the Russians will be 17 and maybe some even just turned 18.

So the fact that they not only manage to compete, but have had so much success against top academies home and abroad and are consistently now winning trophies is a tremendous achievement. The foundations are clearly there now to produce some top talent, and it's a real pleasure to watch every team, from the first team down, playing in the same style, with the same tactics, standards and ethos. This should hopefully provide a steady stream of players, transitioning right through up to the first team. And on the evidence we've seen in the past few years, there's no reason to doubt that we could be on the way to having one of the top academies in the world. Exciting times.
 
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imvaison

Well-Known Member
#28
Another tournament and more valuable experience for our young players. Well done to the Bears and they’ll learn loads from playing international opponents.
 

tazzabear

Well-Known Member
#29
Dinamo starting eleven all 2002's, Rangers started with 6 x 2002's, 4 x2003's and a 2004. Bench was 3 x 2002's, 5 x 2003's and a trialist who I think is a 2002.
I think it’s almost our “policy” for our teams to be a stage younger than what’s required for the tournament.
 

Boydscores

Well-Known Member
#30
In reality probably not. Officially of course, they are, but youth development at the academy has been accelerated at all levels as far as I'm aware. So Rangers teams at all age groups usually have a younger average age than most of their opponents, usually by at least a year as far as I can tell. Just a quick look at a few random players backs this up. Some are 15, most have just turned 16. I assume most of the Russians will be 17 and maybe some even just turned 18.

So the fact that they not only manage to compete, but have had so much success against top academies home and abroad and are consistently now winning trophies is a tremendous achievement. The foundations are clearly there now to produce some top talent, and it's a real pleasure to watch every team, from the first team down, playing in the same style, with the same tactics, standards and ethos. This should hopefully provide a steady stream of players, transitioning right through up to the first team. And on the evidence we've seen in the past few years, there's no reason to doubt that we could be on the way to having one of the top academies in the world. Exciting times.
superb post on Our Academies policy nowadays.
 

elfideldo

Well-Known Member
#32
In reality probably not. Officially of course, they are, but youth development at the academy has been accelerated at all levels as far as I'm aware. So Rangers teams at all age groups usually have a younger average age than most of their opponents, usually by at least a year as far as I can tell. Just a quick look at a few random players backs this up. Some are 15, most have just turned 16. I assume most of the Russians will be 17 and maybe some even just turned 18.

So the fact that they not only manage to compete, but have had so much success against top academies home and abroad and are consistently now winning trophies is a tremendous achievement. The foundations are clearly there now to produce some top talent, and it's a real pleasure to watch every team, from the first team down, playing in the same style, with the same tactics, standards and ethos. This should hopefully provide a steady stream of players, transitioning right through up to the first team. And on the evidence we've seen in the past few years, there's no reason to doubt that we could be on the way to having one of the top academies in the world. Exciting times.
We certainly had a younger team than Croatia Zagreb but to say " Rangers teams at all age groups usually have a younger average age than most of their opponents, usually by at least a year", is not true. At most a couple of younger players will play up a year.

Under 18's is a dual age group so it is natural that the team will be a mix of 17's and 18's. In todays U16 game a Queen's Park only one U15 started, with a couple more as subs. That is the only U15 who regularly plays up, Can't think of any 14's or 13's that play up on a regular basis.

What we have done is move the whole group up when we play weaker opposition, which usually means we will likely lose that game. But they will learn more than the older group winning easily.
 

Yankeeger

Well-Known Member
#33
We certainly had a younger team than Croatia Zagreb but to say " Rangers teams at all age groups usually have a younger average age than most of their opponents, usually by at least a year", is not true. At most a couple of younger players will play up a year.

Under 18's is a dual age group so it is natural that the team will be a mix of 17's and 18's. In todays U16 game a Queen's Park only one U15 started, with a couple more as subs. That is the only U15 who regularly plays up, Can't think of any 14's or 13's that play up on a regular basis.

What we have done is move the whole group up when we play weaker opposition, which usually means we will likely lose that game. But they will learn more than the older group winning easily.


It would seem we use the mention of age on a regular basis to promote winning added with the age mention for loses , DJ played and scored in 1st team at 16

If good enough old enough was the old saying nowadays it’s a mention of age on a daily basis which to me is absolutely irrelevant
 

Earl of Leven

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
#45
This is excellent for player development...and also the road to becoming a pro. It is 95% perspiration and boredom, and very few actual matches. The travel, organising passportsm accommodation, boots, kit etc will all help them to understand the lifestyle of a footballer.
 
#49
Just caught last couple of minutes, that booking for Matty Yates was a joke.

Young ref looked as though he cowardly bowed under pressure from the Atalanta players, despite the fact it was the Italian that was climbing all over Yates.
 
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