SFA tro ban heading the ball for U12's

Yes or No


  • Total voters
    53
  • Poll closed .

GovanFront4

Well-Known Member
Voted No as I don't think it will slow development as such but I'm not in favour of the decision. I don't think kids should really be needing to header the ball at that age. They should be encouraged to play the ball on the deck.
 

Topps

Well-Known Member
I understand why they are banning it at that age however the cases of ex players with dementia have in the main been from a different era where footballs were a bit different in that they were massive heavy fvckers. Modern footballs are much lighter and im not sure the same risk is there although there may be more studies that prove they are still a danger.
Its part of the risk of playing the sport imo. How does boxing or even rugby get round this type of thing for example?
Tbh if kids are seeing the pro's headering a ball they are still going to do it.
 

jdm1873

Well-Known Member
Completely different generation now.

Players back then practiced with medicine balls as well FFS. If we were doing it to encourage the development of playing the ball on the deck etc then it would be a good thing but I think this is just a panic move.
 

Ibroxmassive

Active Member
I understand why they are banning it at that age however the cases of ex players with dementia have in the main been from a different era where footballs were a bit different in that they were massive heavy fvckers. Modern footballs are much lighter and im not sure the same risk is there although there may be more studies that prove they are still a danger.
Its part of the risk of playing the sport imo. How does boxing or even rugby get round this type of thing for example?
Tbh if kids are seeing the pro's headering a ball they are still going to do it.
A 100g ball being leathered at 25mph would hit with the same force as a 50g ball being hit at 50mph. The repeated impacts seem to be a problem, and it’s probably safer to limit the exposure while more tests are run and A greater understanding of the issue is achieved.

means sod all to Scotland’s chances of qualifying for anything anyway.
 

EC54

Well-Known Member
So does that mean if you head the ball from 13 onwards say till your 35 you wont get dementia or there will be less people getting it in the future? I'm not really getting this?
 

BlueHaze

Well-Known Member
Under 12s can concentrate on playing the game on the ground,Ball control,passing and getting used to using both feet the technique of heading can be introduced into their game in stages.
 

Nizzy72

Well-Known Member
So what happens if someone lumps the ball into the air and somebody heads it by mistake? Will it be a free kick to the opposition? A drop ball? Or will the offender be sent off and taken to hospital for a brain scan?
 

RaoulDuke11

Well-Known Member
The SFA, and in turn all other associations, have no choice. The alternative is leaving themselves open to the potential of significant litigation in the future.

It's belt and braces from one angle, but from a risk/liability perspective it's a no brainer.
 

MysticMeg

Well-Known Member
Someone just messaged Clyde 1 SSB saying his Dad has dementia but has never played football in his life, so he doesn’t understand how there can be a link.

That‘s that then.
 

bar72bear

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Good idea will stop kids just lumping it up to the boy that is massive for his age. Focus on passing and moving. You can learn to head a ball when your older
 

SirAlfredofMorelos

Well-Known Member
I mean how many of us, as kids have headered waterlogged/frozen balls and felt quite dizzy afterwards. I'd guess most of us.

Truthfully regardless of the links to dementia, young players should be encouraged to keep the ball on the deck and play with the ball. Could be a way to properly introduce futsal in Scotland as the standard 5s game. Would improve technique long term, in futsal it's all about ball retention and you can just hit the ball off the wall, it goes for a throw in.
 
Top