1941 - When Parkhead was Closed

Stalin

Member
Does anyone have the newspaper cutting from then that shows Celtic fans chanting nazi slogans, leading to the stadium being closed?
 

deedle

Well-Known Member
Parkhead was closed for one month as a result of misbehaviour at Rangers-Celtic fixture at Ibrox.

No newspaper report referring to Nazi chants has ever been posted on the internet. It would have been extremely unlikely that even if such chants had occurred newspapers would have reported this anyway.

We only have anecdotal evidence from Rangers fans who were there but the version I heard was that some Celtic fans indulged in 'pro German songs'.

There is an Evening Times report referring to police storming into the Celtic end to remove (what sounds very much like) an Irish tricolour and being met with flying bottles. The tricolour was viewed as highly provocative when Eire's neutrality was causing Britain major problems.
 

bloodandfire

Well-Known Member
This happened shortly after more than a thousand Glasgow people died in the blitz. I believe Irish flags were the r reason with many seeing Ireland as Nazi collaborators.
 

monkey magic

Well-Known Member
Parkhead was closed for one month as a result of misbehaviour at Rangers-Celtic fixture at Ibrox.

No newspaper report referring to Nazi chants has ever been posted on the internet. It would have been extremely unlikely that even if such chants had occurred newspapers would have reported this anyway.

We only have anecdotal evidence from Rangers fans who were there but the version I heard was that some Celtic fans indulged in 'pro German songs'.

There is an Evening Times report referring to police storming into the Celtic end to remove (what sounds very much like) an Irish tricolour and being met with flying bottles. The tricolour was viewed as highly provocative when Eire's neutrality was causing Britain major problems.
It was closed for pro-German songs. The Bob Crampsey Q&A column in the Evening Times printed as such around 20 years ago.
 

two2tango

Well-Known Member
Official Ticketer
Parkhead was closed for one month as a result of misbehaviour at Rangers-Celtic fixture at Ibrox.

No newspaper report referring to Nazi chants has ever been posted on the internet. It would have been extremely unlikely that even if such chants had occurred newspapers would have reported this anyway.

We only have anecdotal evidence from Rangers fans who were there but the version I heard was that some Celtic fans indulged in 'pro German songs'.

There is an Evening Times report referring to police storming into the Celtic end to remove (what sounds very much like) an Irish tricolour and being met with flying bottles. The tricolour was viewed as highly provocative when Eire's neutrality was causing Britain major problems.
mate that’s not true I seen an article on here few years ago
 

Barryhopez

Well-Known Member
Stadium closed due to disorder at a game at Ibrox according to a newspaper article.

Sir Patrick Dollan told the Glasgow Herald that “it is the most cock eyed judgement I have ever read” and “I hope the Government and Police who have the final say in this matter, will correct a judgement which is more like Nazi philosophy than British fair play and see that both clubs are treated alike.”

It references bottle throwing but nothing about Nazi salutes etc.
 

monkey magic

Well-Known Member
Stadium closed due to disorder at a game at Ibrox according to a newspaper article.

Sir Patrick Dollan told the Glasgow Herald that “it is the most cock eyed judgement I have ever read” and “I hope the Government and Police who have the final say in this matter, will correct a judgement which is more like Nazi philosophy than British fair play and see that both clubs are treated alike.”

It references bottle throwing but nothing about Nazi salutes etc.
Sir Patrick Dollan, the RC Glasgow Lord Provost, upset that his team's ground was closed due to pro-German songs and chants and are victims of unfairness by the SFA. ? What a shocker !
 
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mdingwall

Administrator
Staff member
That was correct however 8 "Irishmen" won VC's in WWII,....7 from the South and the 8th was from the Falls Rd
Several listed as Irishmen had Irish parents but were not born and had not lived in Ireland. At least one born in Ireland to parents stationed there with the Forces.

James Magennis had to move his family from the Falls Road because of the abuse he and they took for serving in the Royal Navy.
 

auldyin

Well-Known Member
Several listed as Irishmen had Irish parents but were not born and had not lived in Ireland. At least one born in Ireland to parents stationed there with the Forces.

James Magennis had to move his family from the Falls Road because of the abuse he and they took for serving in the Royal Navy.
I wasnt aware i just thought that they were "Irish" Going from the Falls to Newry imo would not be a good idea although it was not as "bitter" just post '45
 

monkey magic

Well-Known Member
Reporting restrictions and censorship would have applied.
Goebbels would have a field day if he knew there was thousands of people who despised Britain living in Scotland!
You reckon Goebbels wasn't aware of the German security services already collaborating with the IRA and their sympathisers in Glasgow, who were trying to sabotage and delay new ships being built and slow down munitions being manufactured ?
 

Taki

Well-Known Member
Contemporary newspaper reports refer to bottle-throwing and general hooliganism. There is nothing about pro-German chants.
 

Southernlion

Well-Known Member
James (Mick) Magennis was born in West Belfast and served in the Royal Navy in World War II. He was the only person from Northern Ireland to win the Victoria Cross, and the only person in naval history to exit a submarine (a midget X-craft) in a diving suit, perform a military operation (successfully blowing up a Japanese cruiser in Singapore) and return safely to the same submarine. Yet while honoured in his adopted town of Bradford, England, he was made feel unwelcome and was virtually forgotten in his home town of Belfast.
Author George Fleming rescues Magennis from obscurity in a book which begins with Magennis’s life in West Belfast in the 1920s and ‘30s. He escaped Belfast’s poverty by joining the Royal Navy in 1935. The middle part of the book is packed with adventure and history of the war at sea, and finishes with Magennis winning the Victoria Cross in 1945.
The closing chapters bring the reader back to the reality of his return to Belfast where the political and religious problems had not changed. He was an embarrassment to the Unionist establishment and unwanted by his fellow Catholics. Forced to leave the city, Magennis went to England where he was simply accepted as a war hero. Always a quiet man who never sought glory, ‘Mick’ Magennis died in obscurity in 1986.
History Ireland’s first venture into book publishing, Magennis VC was launched on 23 April at the Submarine Museum, Gosport, England. Rear-Admiral Whetstone presided and praised both the book and its author. Present also was Nat Gould VC, one of the last two surviving naval Victoria Cross winners from the World War II. Guest of honour was Magennis’s son, Paul. On 25 April a reception for the book was held at the reunion of the Ganges Association. George Fleming was overwhelmed at the response from the old sailors who, like Magennis himself, had started their naval careers at this training establishment. On the following day, a special event was organised at Eden Camp Museum, Yorkshire, for the Magennis family, in particular James’s brother Bill. The tour concluded in Belfast City Hall with an unprecedented reception hosted by the Lord Mayor, Alban Maginnis. After years of neglect, this was the first official and long overdue gesture of recognition of the war hero from West Belfast.

Source Published in 18th–19th - Century History, 20th-century / Contemporary History, Issue 2 (Summer 1998), News, Volume 6
 

deedle

Well-Known Member
Contemporary newspaper reports refer to bottle-throwing and general hooliganism. There is nothing about pro-German chants.
Due to the level of censorship at the time, there is no way a newspaper would be allowed to report an outbreak of support for the enemy.

The ‘pro German’ accusation comes from Rangers fans who were at the game.
 

Kylebeg

Active Member
Due to the level of censorship at the time, there is no way a newspaper would be allowed to report an outbreak of support for the enemy.

The ‘pro German’ accusation comes from Rangers fans who were at the game.
I was at a game at the piggery at the time of the Falklands war and they were definitely chanting 'Argentina '. Every chance there would have been chants in support of Germany.
 

Coop1872

Well-Known Member
Several listed as Irishmen had Irish parents but were not born and had not lived in Ireland. At least one born in Ireland to parents stationed there with the Forces.

James Magennis had to move his family from the Falls Road because of the abuse he and they took for serving in the Royal Navy.
A catholic from the Falls remembered on a mural in loyalist Tullycarnet, East Belfast. Those big bad prod bigots eh?

 

monkey magic

Well-Known Member
Due to the level of censorship at the time, there is no way a newspaper would be allowed to report an outbreak of support for the enemy.

The ‘pro German’ accusation comes from Rangers fans who were at the game.
I wish people would stop saying that the closure of the Piggery during WW2 wasn't due to pro-German songs and chants, it was. I actually had the cut-out from the Bob Crampsey Now You Know column in the Evening Times newspaper and lost the clip when I moved house. Crampsey himself would also have been a keen football fan around that time when the wartime incidents occurred. This closure would be in the SFA disciplinary archives, but they would never publish it today.
 

wee bud's pit boots

Well-Known Member
Does anyone have the newspaper cutting from then that shows Celtic fans chanting nazi slogans, leading to the stadium being closed?
I doubt it was Nazi Slogans.

6th, Sept, 1941 and the filth went tonto at Ibrox.

They flew ira/eire tricolours, which quite rightly were identified as pro Nazi paraphernalia at the time.

Sturgeon and various other filth would clap their hands these days in admiration.
 

Bumplittledipper

Well-Known Member
I was at a game at the piggery at the time of the Falklands war and they were definitely chanting 'Argentina '. Every chance there would have been chants in support of Germany.
Supporting Nazis, Argentina, Islamic sects fighting UK troops, IRA terrorists. I am beginning to think they dont like us.

Why the fck do they live here if they hate everything about us? Oh thats right, unemployment benefits and Government rent payment handouts.
 

monkey magic

Well-Known Member
I doubt it was Nazi Slogans.

6th, Sept, 1941 and the filth went tonto at Ibrox.

They flew ira/eire tricolours, which quite rightly were identified as pro Nazi paraphernalia at the time.

Sturgeon and various other filth would clap their hands these days in admiration.

The IRA terrorist campaign in Britain during WW2 was led by an ex-pupil of St Aloysius in Glasgow, and folk are wondering if the peasants weren't openly supporting the Nazis back then during football games in Scotland ? :oops:

 
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