Emma Hayes (Chelsea laddies manager)

PunkScott

Well-Known Member
slightly off topic but the habit nowadays of utter random facts about players does my head in. He had 6 crosses season 2019/20 etc etc etc. i really don’t care can you not just commentate on the match?

“Nobody wins all 3 matches anymore, the last team we’re Germany in 2012” so literally 1 tournament without 1.

I love trivia etc but there’s been some shit this tournament
 

Stevethebluenose90

Well-Known Member
Wasn’t there talk of her going to AFC Wimbledon or am I drunk?
She was linked to there and said it was disrespectful that a female manager who has managed at the highest level in the woman’s game is linked with Wimbledon are division 2 I think.

She forgets that Wimbledon’s under 15’s would destroy her Chelsea team.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
She was linked to there and said it was disrespectful that a female manager who has managed at the highest level in the woman’s game is linked with Wimbledon are division 2 I think.

She forgets that Wimbledon’s under 15’s would destroy her Chelsea team.

Yep, as would any men's professional team taking on their youth team counterparts. Still a valid route for prospective managers.
 
You asked


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She looks like Bobcat Goldthwaite.
 

Johansen

Well-Known Member
I like the cut of Emma Hayes’ gib, she knows her stuff, no the best looking of all the fe-male pundits, but when she talks you listen, she’ll be the first high profile wo-man manageress for a men’s team guaranteed! If I was a gambling man I’d have a wee wager on it ;)
Here's me thinking that Thomas Tuchel was the Chelsea Laddies manager
 

luckywhitefeather

Well-Known Member
Eventually a club , probably with Amazon doing a documentary about it, will try it out

forest green rovers or some such team, will be a huge story / media attention (Wrexham maybe also with the two film star owners)

looking at American sports, nba seems to be slowly creeping towards it, I’m sure a woman took over for the remaining minutes of the games recently as the head coach had been ejected for comments to the ref
 

Laudrup1

Well-Known Member
Yep, as would any men's professional team taking on their youth team counterparts. Still a valid route for prospective managers.

Have you got what the poster was saying the wrong way round?

he was saying that a male u15s team would beat the Chelsea ladies so Hayes's dismissal of only being linked with a lower end men's team is not in line with the abilities she's used to managing.
 

GeoGers

Active Member
I like the cut of Emma Hayes’ gib, she knows her stuff, no the best looking of all the fe-male pundits, but when she talks you listen, she’ll be the first high profile wo-man manageress for a men’s team guaranteed! If I was a gambling man I’d have a wee wager on it ;)
Only came for the pictures, thanks for the heads up.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
Have you got what the poster was saying the wrong way round?

he was saying that a male u15s team would beat the Chelsea ladies so Hayes's dismissal of only being linked with a lower end men's team is not in line with the abilities she's used to managing.

A bit like any manager who makes the job from managing a youth team to managing a professional team?
 

Drumchapel-Bear

Well-Known Member
A bit like any manager who makes the job from managing a youth team to managing a professional team?

Is there many examples of a coach jumping from Youth Team Manager straight up to managing a Professional First Team? There can't be many who have done that. Most would need to work themselves up the ladder by proving themselves through the different levels at the club, building up their experience and reputation before then getting the chance to manage at the top of the club.

If Hayes worked her way up from inside a club then it would be refreshing to see and fair play to her for that. She seems to have ideas above her station though after her comments about the AFC Wimbledon job when she was linked to it previously and insinuating it was a step down. She's probably in a well paid job at Chelsea to be fair and knows she would be out of her depth in the Men's game and is just playing to the gallery.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
Yep, as would any men's professional team taking on their youth team counterparts. Still a valid route for prospective managers.
Women’s football is the standard of young school boys. Managers coaching young school boys generally don’t get touted for big jobs in professional football. If she wants to work in men’s football, she should work her way up from the bottom.

Currently, she is coaching in the women’s game, which is much worse than pub team level.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
Is there many examples of a coach jumping from Youth Team Manager straight up to managing a Professional First Team? There can't be many who have done that. Most would need to work themselves up the ladder by proving themselves through the different levels at the club, building up their experience and reputation before then getting the chance to manage at the top of the club.

If Hayes worked her way up from inside a club then it would be refreshing to see and fair play to her for that. She seems to have ideas above her station though after her comments about the AFC Wimbledon job when she was linked to it previously and insinuating it was a step down. She's probably in a well paid job at Chelsea to be fair and knows she would be out of her depth in the Men's game and is just playing to the gallery.
There isn’t any instances of managers coaching 8 or 9 year old boys (ie women’s level), jumping to big jobs in professional football.
 

Laudrup1

Well-Known Member
A bit like any manager who makes the job from managing a youth team to managing a professional team?

But that manager will also haved played professionally in the senior men's game so has a basis for what they're working with.

She's got neither.

There's not many men coaching u15s who are appointed to first team duties at an English league side (with no other previous experience of management) is there?

And most certainly not at EPL level which is where she was pitching her qualifications at.

I'm a big advocate of the woman's game and the Rangers team. Hayes is way off thinking that she's in line for an EPL appointment is the point I was making.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
But that manager will also haved played professionally in the senior game so has a basis for what they're working with.

She's got neither.

There's not many men coaching u15s who are appointed to first team duties in an English league side (with no other previous experience) is there and certainly not at EPL level which is where she was pitching her qualifications at.
Women's football isn't anywhere close to being as high a standard as u15's. Whenever 14/15 year olds play female teams, it's a cricket score. Women's football as I've said previously would be more akin to 8 or 9 year olds, if that.
 

Drumchapel-Bear

Well-Known Member
There isn’t any instances of managers coaching 8 or 9 year old boys (ie women’s level), jumping to big jobs in professional football.

Certainly not many I can think of?

The counter argument of guys like Mourinho and AVB doesn't stand up to scrutiny when you consider guys like that were involved at the top clubs for years in the background building up their experience and more importantly their reputation at the club amongst the players.
 

Laudrup1

Well-Known Member
Women's football isn't anywhere close to being as high a standard as u15's. Whenever 14/15 year olds play female teams, it's a cricket score. Women's football as I've said previously would be more akin to 8 or 9 year olds, if that.

I think that's over egging it a bit. A Primary 4 boy isn't going to be able to play against a professional female who is fully grown.

I take your point though about the gulf being huge as soon as a boy develops to early adulthood.
 

Thornliebank_Bear

Well-Known Member
Isnt there a video posted on here all the time with beautiful blonde ref kiddin on shes giving the guy a card, no one says she shouldnt be a ref as shes nowhere near the level of scottish refs, wont understawn the laws of the game and how to deal with men on the park. Theres also a female lineswomen that does the EPL games i see her doing games all the time.

How can one burd handle pressure of making huge calls on the pitch but another couldnt handle the pressure that comes with buying or dealing with players at Barnet or Stenhousemuir ?

Are we really sure that nice guys like Southgate or even Warburton(and i have nothing against either of them Mark done a good job here) are really much stronger characters than Emma Hayes or any other top female managers ?

One more daft question, has any other nation tried a women coach in mens game ? i know people keep saying no chance no fkin way will i let it happen, has it though abroad at a lower level id be surprised if no club has ever tried it even if its just to grab some headlines and bring more fans to the game.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
Certainly not many I can think of?

The counter argument of guys like Mourinho and AVB doesn't stand up to scrutiny when you consider guys like that were involved at the top clubs for years in the background building up their experience and more importantly their reputation at the club amongst the players.
Indeed, they worked their way up.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
Isnt there a video posted on here all the time with beautiful blonde ref kiddin on shes giving the guy a card, no one says she shouldnt be a ref as shes nowhere near the level of scottish refs, wont understawn the laws of the game and how to deal with men on the park. Theres also a female lineswomen that does the EPL games i see her doing games all the time.

How can one burd handle pressure of making huge calls on the pitch but another couldnt handle the pressure that comes with buying or dealing with players at Barnet or Stenhousemuir ?

Are we really sure that nice guys like Southgate or even Warburton(and i have nothing against either of them Mark done a good job here) are really much stronger characters than Emma Hayes or any other top female managers ?

One more daft question, has any other nation tried a women coach in mens game ? i know people keep saying no chance no fkin way will i let it happen, has it though abroad at a lower level id be surprised if no club has ever tried it even if its just to grab some headlines.
I don't think many here would have an issue with a woman working her way up in the men's game from the bottom and getting the role on merit. The general argument is that football is being badly affected by wokeism, with women being rammed down our throats in all the match analysis, and now being touted for men's jobs too, even if they don't have any relevant experience.

Also, Warburton did a good job?
 

Thornliebank_Bear

Well-Known Member
I don't think many here would have an issue with a woman working her way up in the men's game from the bottom and getting the role on merit. The general argument is that football is being badly affected by wokeism, with women being rammed down our throats in all the match analysis, and now being touted for men's jobs too, even if they don't have any relevant experience.

Also, Warburton did a good job?
What do you mean by the bottom starting at the 10th tier or something ?

Thats insane its not up to anyone on here to decide where smaller clubs in League 1 in Scotland or England look for a manager. Same as they dont ever have to entertain the idea of a female coach if they dont want one.

Theres managers getting jobs all the time at the top level with little or no experience even someone like Rooney. Scott Brown will do same here.

There is too many women as pundits right enough i couldnt disagree with that part but maybe the men have to start saying something interesting. None of the ladies are worse than Jenas hes dreadful look at coverage of our games we get Walker and Crocker that is without a doubt the bottom of the barrel.

Its another thread MW couldnt sort his defence but done a lot of good things i dont see his time as being negative he signed tav, knocked out the tims, won the championship playing nice football, he was alright maybe a little too obsessed with pep and all that nonsense but not a bad appointment.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
Is there many examples of a coach jumping from Youth Team Manager straight up to managing a Professional First Team? There can't be many who have done that. Most would need to work themselves up the ladder by proving themselves through the different levels at the club, building up their experience and reputation before then getting the chance to manage at the top of the club.

If Hayes worked her way up from inside a club then it would be refreshing to see and fair play to her for that. She seems to have ideas above her station though after her comments about the AFC Wimbledon job when she was linked to it previously and insinuating it was a step down. She's probably in a well paid job at Chelsea to be fair and knows she would be out of her depth in the Men's game and is just playing to the gallery.

I genuinely think this debate is really interesting and it's a shame that it's so often lowered to the level of she-can't-be-considered-because-women's-football-is-so-much-worse-than-men. I think it's a bit of a misnomer.

What I think is really important is the idea of compensating experience. Gerrard progressed from youth team manager to professional manager not on the back of his work with Liverpool's under 18s but on the back of his brilliant playing career. Mourinho, Klopp, Tuchel, Wenger, etc. were the opposite: limited playing experience compensated by working with brilliant coaches. The manager of the Canada men's national team, John Herdman, didn't play football, didn't work with great coaches, and got his job on the back of working with the women.

With Emma Hayes, we have a figure who hasn't played professional men's football or worked with the best coaches in men's football, but who is very clearly a good manager - in women's football, at least. So the question ultimately comes down to this: is being the very best manager in English women's football enough compensating experience to manage a team in the bottom half of League Two?

The ironic thing is that AFC Wimbledon appointed a guy as manager with no playing experience and no managerial experience; his limited experience was in coaching the youth team. Not one person batted an eyelid at this.
 

Drumchapel-Bear

Well-Known Member
I genuinely think this debate is really interesting and it's a shame that it's so often lowered to the level of she-can't-be-considered-because-women's-football-is-so-much-worse-than-men. I think it's a bit of a misnomer.

What I think is really important is the idea of compensating experience. Gerrard progressed from youth team manager to professional manager not on the back of his work with Liverpool's under 18s but on the back of his brilliant playing career. Mourinho, Klopp, Tuchel, Wenger, etc. were the opposite: limited playing experience compensated by working with brilliant coaches. The manager of the Canada men's national team, John Herdman, didn't play football, didn't work with great coaches, and got his job on the back of working with the women.

With Emma Hayes, we have a figure who hasn't played professional men's football or worked with the best coaches in men's football, but who is very clearly a good manager - in women's football, at least. So the question ultimately comes down to this: is being the very best manager in English women's football enough compensating experience to manage a team in the bottom half of League Two?

The ironic thing is that AFC Wimbledon appointed a guy as manager with no playing experience and no managerial experience; his limited experience was in coaching the youth team. Not one person batted an eyelid at this.

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Mark Robinson as Head Coach with immediate effect.

Mark has been Interim Manager since January 30 and will need no introduction to Wimbledon fans, having been with the Club since 2004. He holds a UEFA A coaching licence, and has served the Club as Head of Youth, Centre of Excellence Manager, Academy Manager, Lead Professional Phase Coach and Loan Manager, First Team Coach and, most recently, Interim Manager of the first team.


That example is the epitome of working your way to the top of a club or any organisation for that matter on merit.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
We are delighted to announce the appointment of Mark Robinson as Head Coach with immediate effect.

Mark has been Interim Manager since January 30 and will need no introduction to Wimbledon fans, having been with the Club since 2004. He holds a UEFA A coaching licence, and has served the Club as Head of Youth, Centre of Excellence Manager, Academy Manager, Lead Professional Phase Coach and Loan Manager, First Team Coach and, most recently, Interim Manager of the first team.


That example is the epitome of working your way to the top of a club or any organisation for that matter on merit.

No one is denying the importance of working to the top of a club or organisation based on merit. For some people, that comes through working at a single club (Robinson); for others, it comes through an apprenticeship at a range of different coaching roles - Mourinho's coaching career with Barcelona and Porto was enough for him to get a top flight without having to work through the ranks at Benfica first.

Working through the ranks in men's football would undoubtedly help, but the question of Hayes' suitability is based on the relative merits of experience with a League 2 club and experience at the top of women's football.
 

Drumchapel-Bear

Well-Known Member
No one is denying the importance of working to the top of a club or organisation based on merit. For some people, that comes through working at a single club (Robinson); for others, it comes through an apprenticeship at a range of different coaching roles - Mourinho's coaching career with Barcelona and Porto was enough for him to get a top flight without having to work through the ranks at Benfica first.

Working through the ranks in men's football would undoubtedly help, but the question of Hayes' suitability is based on the relative merits of experience with a League 2 club and experience at the top of women's football.

Absolutely and by all objective measures the level she has experience at is nowhere near what she would be stepping into. That's before you even get to the issues around the fact she would be managing Men rather than Women and all the different obstacles that would bring. Men are totally different personalties to Women and just wired up differently.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
Absolutely and by all objective measures the level she has experience at is nowhere near what she would be stepping into. That's before you even get to the issues around the fact she would be managing Men rather than Women and all the different obstacles that would bring. Men are totally different personalties to Women and just wired up differently.

The quality of the football would be vastly different, of course, but how does that really manifest itself in terms of team selection, tactics, formation, etc? Are we saying that her understanding of football - gleaned from being on UEFA courses, working in America, having the resources at Chelsea - puts her at a significant disadvantage against a League 2 journeyman manager who only knows hoofball?

I think the last point is a bit disingenuous as well. Women hold important positions in every area of our society: politics, culture, government, sport. In football there are chairwomen, women data analysts, women physios, women coaches, women owners. In an era where the significance of the manager as a figure in a football team's success is lessened every year, I don't think the idea of a women telling a League 2 player to clear his lines more often is that much of a novel idea. I've said this before, but it's the same kind of demeaning idea that the first female school teachers, ministers, MPs, etc, had to put up with. It affected both Thatcher and May, and says more about one of the groups than the other.
 

Hurricane Run

Well-Known Member
There are thousands of male football managers who fall into this category as well. Some of them have even managed at Rangers. Obviously, the relative merits of Walter or Pedro weren't discussed in terms of their respective genders - both being male, of course - but rather in terms of the respect they garnered from players. A female football manager would be a success if they managed that and a failure if they didn't. From what I can see, male footballers treat female officials better than they do their male counterparts.

Interestingly (and somewhat embarrassingly), the a-woman-wouldn't-be-fit-for-this-job is the kind of rhetoric that has often surrounded women being given jobs traditionally meant for men. It was also there when Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister. That one turned out okay, didn't it?

Youre miles off the mark. Youre trying to apply logic and standards, to an environment where they dont exist. Thatcher never had someone screaming in their face and threatening them with physical violence, for dropping a player, or costing them a goal bonus they needed by taking them off early. Ive seen more than a handful of full blown scraps. Theres also a heavy "lad" culture, where weakness is ruthlessly exposed. Honestly i could go on, but whenever you read people talk about controlling a dressing room, like its some sort of office environment, theres no real point in the discussion.

The point about female officials is miles off as well. All officials need to be respected, its the very nature of the position. If you are playing a crucial game and a ref, male or female, make a bad decision. You cant just tell them exactly what you think of them. You can certainly tell your manager what you think of them in the dressing room though. It happens all the time, and it happens on occasion with venom and even physicality.

I doubt there would be any level of respect for a women, whos never even been involved in the mens game as a coach previously either. Its great to see all the wonderfully virtuous people im lucky to share a forum with, unfortunately those type of noble virtues are forgotten on the back of a run of bad defeats and in the heat of the moment things will happen that cant be un-said/un-done.
 

ClockworkOrange

Well-Known Member
Youre miles off the mark. Youre trying to apply logic and standards, to an environment where they dont exist. Thatcher never had someone screaming in their face and threatening them with physical violence, for dropping a player, or costing them a goal bonus they needed by taking them off early. Ive seen more than a handful of full blown scraps. Theres also a heavy "lad" culture, where weakness is ruthlessly exposed. Honestly i could go on, but whenever you read people talk about controlling a dressing room, like its some sort of office environment, theres no real point in the discussion.

The point about female officials is miles off as well. All officials need to be respected, its the very nature of the position. If you are playing a crucial game and a ref, male or female, make a bad decision. You cant just tell them exactly what you think of them. You can certainly tell your manager what you think of them in the dressing room though. It happens all the time, and it happens on occasion with venom and even physicality.

I doubt there would be any level of respect for a women, whos never even been involved in the mens game as a coach previously either. Its great to see all the wonderfully virtuous people im lucky to share a forum with, unfortunately those type of noble virtues are forgotten on the back of a run of bad defeats and in the heat of the moment things will happen that cant be un-said/un-done.

I've seen some terrible sights at football as well, and watching football on the telly, I've seen male referees being pushed, punched, verbally abused and spat on.

I've yet to see any of this kind of stuff committed towards any of England's female officials.

In fact, the closest we've came to a scandal, in years of female officials in English football, is a footballer putting his arm around Sian Massey's shoulder.

If my mistake is to apply logic and standards to an environment where they don't exist, yours is to suggest that a female figure in that position would be treated the exact same way as they would a male.

It's also not a particularly virtuous position I'm taking either: it's depressing to see the woke card played earlier in the thread, because 1. She hasn't been appointed and 2. I'm ambivalent myself about how she would get on. Hayes being a women isn't only part of the argument: it's also about the relative merits of women's and men's football.
 

Max Payne

Active Member
No one is denying the importance of working to the top of a club or organisation based on merit. For some people, that comes through working at a single club (Robinson); for others, it comes through an apprenticeship at a range of different coaching roles - Mourinho's coaching career with Barcelona and Porto was enough for him to get a top flight without having to work through the ranks at Benfica first.

Working through the ranks in men's football would undoubtedly help, but the question of Hayes' suitability is based on the relative merits of experience with a League 2 club and experience at the top of women's football.
There is no comparison to be had at all between professional men’s football and women’s.
 

Thornliebank_Bear

Well-Known Member
Absolutely and by all objective measures the level she has experience at is nowhere near what she would be stepping into. That's before you even get to the issues around the fact she would be managing Men rather than Women and all the different obstacles that would bring. Men are totally different personalties to Women and just wired up differently.
But you dont know if she would manage men better than some of the male managers. Maybe some male managers at the lower levels are hopeless.

Id guess the reason you see female cops all the time is that they are able to calm a situation down and get folk to relax.

You also dont know if some players would enjoy playing for a female coach that might be more interested in a passing game then going out to win their battles and fight for each other out there. Maybe she loves Pep and is fascinated by his style of football.

She would also be able to bring in male coaches to help in certain areas this is something folk miss or probably just ignore as they get more and more upset.

I also find it odd that league one has become so powerful and such a high standard ever since the woman was linked to the mighty Wimbledon... the way you are talking about it big Josh should have picked up this years balloon door.B-D
 

Hurricane Run

Well-Known Member
I've seen some terrible sights at football as well, and watching football on the telly, I've seen male referees being pushed, punched, verbally abused and spat on.

I've yet to see any of this kind of stuff committed towards any of England's female officials.

In fact, the closest we've came to a scandal, in years of female officials in English football, is a footballer putting his arm around Sian Massey's shoulder.

If my mistake is to apply logic and standards to an environment where they don't exist, yours is to suggest that a female figure in that position would be treated the exact same way as they would a male.

It's also not a particularly virtuous position I'm taking either: it's depressing to see the woke card played earlier in the thread, because 1. She hasn't been appointed and 2. I'm ambivalent myself about how she would get on. Hayes being a women isn't only part of the argument: it's also about the relative merits of women's and men's football.

Ive not seen any of the things you describe happen in the modern game. They cracked down on abuse at the pro level years ago. Players know its an automatic red card if they overstep the mark. Anyway i digress, out of the spotlight female officials are regularly abused. Im sure its something like 1/3 of them at amateur and youth level have suffered abuse of some kind. Youth football in particular, where the environment is more unregulated and organic.

Your point about my view, is fair. Personally i think there would be an inherent bias against them for a number of reasons, which would make it difficult. For starters, it would be unnatural to most male players. Youre putting someone in with no experience in the mens game whatsoever. That would feel more like a social experiment, than a natural appointment. Almost like the players would need to play Guinea pig at the potential detriment of their careers. That wont be well received. Secondly, a lot of these players intend to go into coaching and managing. These positions are already over subscribed. Your asking players to accept even more competition from those who are underqualified, having never even been in the mens game. Its not in a players interest to make that work.

The only way i think it even has a chance of working, would be if a female came through the coaching ranks at a male club and earned a position on merit. Saying Hayes is a good manager, for example. Is a fallacy. Shes a good manager in the womans game. The mens game is a totally different sport. Therefore, objectively, it would be overreaching and unnatural to make that appointment.
 

Tailwind

Well-Known Member
Watching the Austria Ukraine game because it had more riding on it

Irrespective of sex, she has a boring, monotone, droney voice. It just doesn’t make for good tv/commentary.

Unfortunately she has one of those accents that makes you sound like your not too intelligent as well, like a strong brummie accent as another example of what I meanl
 

Tailwind

Well-Known Member
Watching the Austria Ukraine game because it had more riding on it

Irrespective of sex, she has a boring, monotone, droney voice. It just doesn’t make for good tv/commentary.

Unfortunately she has one of those accents that makes you sound like your not too intelligent as well, like a strong brummie accent as another example of what I meanl
This Croatia Spain game would be better without her droney voice

I am the same unfortunately, I have that dull monotone voice that just isn’t good to listen to for 2x45mins
 
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govan86

Well-Known Member
Is she getting paid by the word?? Couldn't help laughing when she stated "it has to be said" - no doubt there Emma. If it has to be said you're saying it!!
 
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